THE BRITISH LIBRARY

Innovation and enterprise blog

84 posts categorized "Start-ups"

17 March 2017

Dry Patch - A BIPC success story with a great sense of humour

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Dry-Patch-logoSo many people think running a business has to be a serious matter. So it is refreshing when an entrepreneur proves the opposite.

I guess the most well known recent brand with a funny-bone is Innocent Drinks. They have included grass covered vans, a banana phone and slides in their offices, and a whole range of humorous labels on their bottles such as this one:

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I first met Chris Gomez founder and CEO of Dry Patch a couple of years ago in an Advice Clinic here in the Business & IP Centre in London.

He immediately made an impression with his passion for the product, his professionalism, and understanding of his customers' needs. He also recognised he was addressing a niche market with his first product the Moto Seat Cover below. As a fellow motorcyclist and cyclist, I could see there was a lot of potential in his ideas.

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Once his website was up and running, I was pleasantly surprised to see just how much humour Chris had used to promote his brand. Here are a few examples:

  • With a focus on innovation and lifestyle, our premium products will keep you and your stuff dry... from the bottom up
  • We're not hairy bikers or Tour de France wannabes. We don't wear leather or Lycra to and from work but we do love the freedom of 2 wheels.
  • We're not going to ask you to start hugging each other at the traffic lights, but we are all 2 wheeled commuters and suffer the same conditions - from both the weather and other traffic.
  • We know that we are just little pin pricks in the bottom of the 1.5 million 2 wheel commuters in London, but we dream of being big pricks.

I also love the way Chris spells out his brand values in such clear terms:

When it comes to our products, we have 4 key values:

  1. it's kit you want (more on this below).
  2. it is 100% functional - our kit works really well and is made of the best materials for the job.
  3. it has to look great - there's too much stuff out there that works brilliantly for commuters on 2 wheels, that just doesn't look very good.
  4. our kit will always be innovative - we believe innovation is the key to developing brilliant new products that disrupt the rest of the market.

And even better Chris makes fantastic use of the Dry-Patch blog and social media channels. Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Pinterest, and YouTube.

 Written by Neil Infield on behalf Business & IP Centre

22 December 2016

Why entering awards are good for you and your small business

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As a busy business owner you need to find ways to promote what you do with maximum impact. You know the value of your business or service and can shout about it from the top of your lungs all day long. But what’s even more impactful is when other people do it for you. Along with using testimonials on your website and social media from customers you can also enter awards. Win a business award and you’ll create a buzz around your business, enhance your brand and have your story shared in the press. But you have to be in it to win it! Keep track of your networks for news about when their award programmes are running and think of all the of strings to your bow when considering which categories give you and your business the best chance of success.

One awards programme coming up for female business founders is the Veuve Clicquot Business Woman Awards - regarded as the Oscars for female entrepreneurs and business leaders. Set up in 1972 as a tribute to their own female founder, Madame Clicquot, the awards continue to champion the success of women worldwide who share the same enterprising spirit, courage and determination to succeed.

As well as their Business Woman of the Year Award, they are looking for strong nominations to apply for their Social Purpose Award (businesswomen championing social purpose beyond their core business case) and New Generation (under 35 year old) awards. Nominations close on 30 December 2016.

A recent winner of the Veuve Clicquot New Generation award was Jenny Dawson Costa, founder and CEO of relish range Rubies in the Rubble, and graduate of our Business & IP Centre’s ‘Growth Club’. Earlier this year Jenny shared with us how the business began:

“The idea for Rubies in the Rubble came after a very early morning visit to a wholesale fruit and veg market on my bike one frosty day in November 2010. I fell in love with the market - such a diverse range of people living by night and sleeping by day; a world of farmers, wholesalers, restaurant owners and market sellers trading anything from durians to brussel sprouts.

But just along from the bustle of the traders were the piles of unwanted fruit and veg - mange tout from Kenya, mangos from the Philippines, tomatoes from Turkey, cranberries for California which bypassed the bustle of traders and headed straight for the bin! And what really saddened me was that much of these, though potentially with a short shelf life, were perfectly edible!

It got me thinking about the impossibility of matching supply and demand when you have unpredictable weather, unpredictable humans and supermarkets that provide everything in plentiful piles throughout the year.

I then buried myself in researching food waste and realising its scale and implications – both environmentally and financially. However, it was a simple fact that compelled me to act: we are wasting 1/3 of all the food we produce, whilst 1bn people go to bed hungry. I’m not saying I know the solution but there are improvements that we can make to the current system.

And then it came to me: a premium food brand making delicious products from fruit and vegetables that would otherwise be discarded.”

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We’re huge fans of the Rubies relish and continue to work with Jenny to grow the company. If your own story is just as powerful then think about applying for the New Generation or Social Purpose award 2017.

At our next ‘Inspiring Entrepreneurs: Internet Icons’ event, on Tuesday 7 February, you will have the chance to listen to and meet the Veuve Clicquot Business Woman Award winner  Woman of the Year for 2016, Sarah Wood, who’s marketing agency Unruly has been behind fantastic campaigns such as the Compare the Market’s meerkat adverts.

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The event will see Sarah share her story alongside three other inspiring entrepreneurs; founders of SpareRoom, Bloom & Wild and Deliciously Ella. You can join us in the British Library or watch from home with our free of charge webcast. You’ll also have the opportunity to question the panel about how you find the right awards to apply to and ask for tips on how to win.

If you are a female founder and fit the mould for the New Generation or Social Impact Awards then here are some useful tips for submitting a 5 star application:

  1. Give yourself enough time to answer the questions to the best of your ability and to shine a light on your achievements
  2. Don’t be shy! Be sure to give a compelling reason within each answer for why you and your business deserve to be the winner
  3. Be honest. However tempting to inflate the details be truthful and so avoid potential PR problems later on
  4. Have attention to detail – have you answered all the questions fully, within the word limit and hitting all the key criteria?

Good luck with your applications and maybe you'll be the next winner of the Veuve Clicquot Business Woman Awards

 

24 November 2016

A Global Entrepreneurship Week thank-you. You made our week!

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Thank you to all who attended an amazing week of events making Global Entrepreneurship Week 2016 such a great success.

We look back on the British Library’s Global Entrepreneurship Week 2016 campaign, kindly supported by Microsoft.

Microsoft

For the Business & IP Centre team, 2016 has been a year of celebration. This is the 10th year that we’ve been helping people from all walks of life to start, protect and grow successful businesses. Since launching in 2006, we’ve been able to connect with bigger and broader audiences each year, and now with an expanding network of Business & IP Centres across the country it’s never been easier to get the help you need to take your business idea to the next stage.

We started the week bright and early on Monday morning, by hosting the official launch of the UK Global Entrepreneurship Week campaign and went on to deliver a jam-packed week of inspiration, insider tips, networking and knowledge-sharing. Here are just some of the highlights:

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 Question Time for Entrepreneurs

If you’ve got questions, then we’ve got the answers! Our popular Question Time for Entrepreneurs event brought together some of the UK’s brightest business brains including Edwina Dunn, co-founder of DunnHumby, Simon Devonshire OBE, founder of Wayra and Government’s Entrepreneur in Residence, as well as Helen Pattison, co-founder of Montezuma's chocolates and Lesley Batchelor from the Institute of Export. Our panel discussed their own business journeys and debated a range of topical issues from Brexit to branding, with plenty of opportunities for our audience to ask questions.

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Our top tip from Question Time comes from Simon Devonshire who advised business owners to focus on identifying the ‘most powerful action’ (or MPA) in their business - in other words, to pinpoint the one thing they can do to achieve the biggest impact and then do it.

You can also view previous Inspiring Entrepreneurs on our YouTube channel BIPC TV

Inspiring Entrepreneurs: The White Company and Charles Tyrwhitt

Our entrepreneurial ‘Mr & Mrs’ Chrissie Rucker, founder of the White Company and Nick Wheeler, founder of Charles Tyrwhitt shirts, have both built up formidable retail empires,  with each successfully making the transition from mail order to multichannel (online and bricks and mortar). At this ‘fireside chat,’ both Chrissie and Nick spoke candidly about knowing how they made some mistakes along the way but managed to bounce back.  They also gave very practical advice on how to remain focused and stick to your vision and to always put yourself in the shoes of the customer. One of the main insights that Chrissie gave about building your business was:

“Having a business is a gift. Surround yourself with a brilliant people who share your passion and are right for the different stages of your business.”

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Your Life, Your Business

Business and Life Coach, Rasheed Ogunlaru presented his workshop ‘Your Life, Your Business.’ Running a small business will increase the demands on your own time and lifestyle. Rasheed’s workshop helps you to get the balance right, while at the same time helping to set realistic goals for you and the business.  

Rasheed likens being an entrepreneur to being an athlete, and he advises business owners to“study your field, master your craft, gather your team, know your competitors, win and keep supporters, learn from trials and errors and keep your eye on your goal.”

If you missed last week’s workshop, Rasheed will be delivering this on the 12 December

The Idler Academy:  Killer business ideas

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Everyone at the Business & IP Centre is passionate about supporting new businesses to succeed and grow.  Therefore we were delighted to be joined by twin brothers Gary and Alan Keery, founders of the Cereal Killer Cafe, which is surely one of the most talked-about start-ups in recent years. Since launching in 2014, the retro-inspired Cereal Killer Café has truly captured the public imagination and the Keery brothers have experienced both the best and worst of being in the media spotlight.  At this frank and entertaining event, moderated by Tom Hodgkinson of The Idler magazine, the boys shared the story of how their passion for cereal inspired a killer business idea.  The brothers implored aspiring entrepreneurs to stay true to their convictions, not to listen to the naysayers and to fiercely protect their brand.  They also stressed that new businesses need to be willing to learn skills quickly where necessary – something that the Business & IP Centre’s courses and workshops across a variety of business topics can help you with. 

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Last but not least, if you’re setting up office, we are delighted that Microsoft, our Global Entrepreneurship Partner, is offering our users a special discount on their Office 365 product. Find out more.

23 September 2016

Find out how one man turned his “light bulb moment” into reality

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Guy Jeremiah invented the Ohyo collapsible water bottle when he had a “light bulb moment” in the train station, proving that inspiration can hit you anywhere. Guy then took the crucial steps to turn his idea into a viable business. Today Ohyo bottles are stocked by a large number of major retailers and are exported all over the world. We asked him what he needed to do in those early days to make it happen.

Hi Guy! Where did the idea come from to start your own business?

Ohyo was born out of necessity. I found myself at St Pancras station with no water fountain in sight, no bottle in my pocket, and no option but to buy a bottle of water. From my background in running my own environmental consultancy business, I knew the wasted resources that made that bottle of water. It takes a quarter litre of oil and up to 7 litres of water to make 1 litre of bottled water. There are enough plastic bottles discarded every year to stretch round the world 1,000 times!

I concluded that people are reluctant to carry re-usable bottles because they are too bulky and invented Ohyo as a handy, collapsible water bottle that’s easy to take anywhere. An extended Ohyo holds 500ml, or 1,000ml for the larger version. When empty, an Ohyo will compress down to fit in a pocket. Using (and re-using) an Ohyo avoids the need to buy environmentally-damaging bottled water. In summer 2009 we cycled round London looking for fountains and established a free app for users to find drinking water sources near them.

How did the Business & IP Centre help you along the way?

The next step for Ohyo, was just a stone’s throw from my Eureka moment! Having seen an ad on the tube declaring “Got a great idea, we can help you protect it”, I made my way to the then newly-formed Business & IP Centre at the British Library. They quickly helped me to do some research that established that my design was patentable and, furthermore, did not breach anyone else’s patent. This gave me the confidence to invest the time and cash to develop the idea and protect my intellectual property.

Having traded for a few years, I was then accepted on to the Innovating for Growth programme to help me get my business to the next phase. Participation on the programme included attending workshops and valuable face-to-face support. Launching your own business can be quite lonely, but with the support of the Business & IP Centre and networking with like-minded businesses I never felt alone. When times got tough, such as bullying from major retailers, the Business & IP Centre was my first port of call for expert help in establishing my clear legal position.

What have been your greatest achievements since starting up?

From my initial idea in 2008 to prototype, it took me two years before launching to great acclaim in 2010 at Prince Charles’ “Garden Party to Make a Difference” at Clarence House. In 2012, I struck a major deal to stock the bottles in Marks & Spencer as part of their “Plan A Sustainability Campaign”; a great example of how sustainable credentials can help to promote a product. The bottles are "carbon neutral" after just two to three uses. M&S were great to work with and made a major contribution to our worldwide sales total of 700,000 bottles since 2010!

What one piece of crucial advice would you give to anyone thinking about starting a business?

Understand your cash flow by keeping accurate records and making realistic predictions. You’ll sleep better at night if you know the money isn’t about to run out. And if it is going to run out, it’s better to have enough warning so you can do something about it!

We’ve been helping people like Guy turn great ideas into businesses for over 10 years now. To celebrate we’re holding a day of free workshops, talks and events on everything you need to know to start a business, from raising cash to getting your business online. You’ll meet like-minded people, chat to seasoned business experts and entrepreneurs and even get your first professional headshot. And our new ‘Entrepreneur in Residence’, Julie Deane (founder and CEO of The Cambridge Satchel Company), will be showing you how to start a business from your kitchen table. So join us at the British Library on the 27 September and get inspired to take your first step to entrepreneurship.

 

19 September 2016

How one woman turned her passion for swimming into a successful business

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A keen swimmer and all-round active person Lisa Irlam noticed a gap in the market and took the plunge into the wearable fitness technology world. Her business, Swimovate, launched in 2007 and since then the business has gone from strength to strength, selling the innovative PoolMate - a waterproof watch the counts your laps while you swim.  We asked Lisa some of our burning questions about how she got started and became the success story she is today.

Hi Lisa! Where did the idea come from to start your own business?

As amateur triathletes, my husband Jim and I realised that there were plenty of products to monitor performance for runners and athletes, but nothing for swimmers. We talked to retailers, magazines, triathletes and swimmers who all said they would buy a product if it existed. There was a gap in the market and the PoolMate idea was born.

How did the Business & IP Centre help you along the way?

Initially we did some technical research, reading scientific papers at the British Library and discovered the Business & IP Centre and what an amazing range of support and services it offered. We attended free workshops on intellectual property and researching your market and spent a lot of time searching the databases that the Centre provides access to. It really helped us to understand our field and what we needed to do to make our business a success. Through the Business & IP Centre we met some inspiring and very helpful people who gave us invaluable advice and support, completely free of charge.

What have been your greatest achievements since starting up?

The best feeling was selling out of our first batch before it had even been delivered and knowing we were at the start of something massive. After selling over 100,000 units, it still gives us a buzz to see our watches on people’s wrists on the street.

What one piece of crucial advice would you give to anyone thinking about starting a business?

Be very careful with your finances, it’s easy to get carried away with costs. Make sure you only risk what you are prepared to lose. Try to do as much as possible yourself, this will teach you so much and don’t forget to make use of all the great free resources out there, like the Business & IP Centre.

 

We’ve been helping people like Lisa turn great ideas into businesses for over 10 years now. To celebrate we’re holding a day of free workshops, talks and events on everything you need to know to start a business, from raising cash to getting your business online. You’ll meet like-minded people, chat to seasoned business experts and entrepreneurs and even get your first professional headshot. And our new ‘Entrepreneur in Residence’, Julie Deane (founder and CEO of The Cambridge Satchel Company), will be showing you how to start a business from your kitchen table. Join us at the British Library on the 27 September and get inspired to take your first step to entrepreneurship.

 

30 August 2016

Tips on taking photographs for your business

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Pictures speak a thousand words, or so the saying goes. And now that virtually everyone has a camera in their pocket on their smartphone, there’s no excuse these days for not using as many photos as possible within your business, whether it is for record shots, editorial on your website, social media content or PR. Could you imagine a website without photos or images?

Of course businesses have a myriad of photo requirements and a photography budget ranging from less than zero to thousands of pounds. So whilst hiring a professional is a great idea with a pretty clear quality outcome, almost everything can be done in-house using the most basic of equipment and it can still look good. Just a little knowledge can go a long way, so here are a few ideas:

1. Headshots and people photos

Do you ever get invited to connect on LinkedIn by a mysterious white silhouette - or followed on Twitter by a white egg on a coloured background? Does that instil confidence in their professionalism?

Sam lane

People buy from people and therefore they want to see real people. “About you” sections on your website, profile pictures in the company brochure, even snaps on ID badges play a crucial part in the identity of your business. Here are some tips to get it right:

  • Make direct eye contact with the subject – this engenders trust and conveys empathy
  • Depending on the image you want to portray, I think smiling is as important as eye contact in building rapport
  • Posing makes a difference too: posing your subject with shoulders at slight angle is more flattering for anyone than front on (aka prisoner-style) photos
  • Plain backgrounds will help the subject to stand out
  • Get in quite close, especially when you consider the size the image may be viewed at e.g. a full page in an A4 magazine or a thumbnail on a smart phone?

2. Lifestyle shots

If you have a business where you need people to do something in your photos, you’ll need to build a brief that will drive the creative approach – the more planning you do the better. Consider location, whether indoors or out, props and models, styling, make up and actions. Having a clear idea of the sort of images you are looking for can avoid spending unnecessary time setting up a studio using models, when you can simply ask your friend to pose instead if you require something more informal. Planning is key.

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3. Still life products

You may need to take photos for an e-commerce site to sell your products or need imagery for a retail magazine. White backgrounds are usually the norm, with or without shadow; and some element of post-production (e.g. using Photoshop) may be necessary to ensure consistency in shine, shadows and backgrounds. Mastering the light makes all the difference too – even using a white sheet draped over a chair and an angle-poised lamp can get you started.

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4. Food photography

A lot of fakery can go into making the sumptuously delicious-looking and mouth-watering food images used in advertising. From using hairspray and glue, to photo-shopping in fake steam - I’ve seen it all! However, it doesn’t have to be this way. Many restaurants and cafes have really mastered their food photography, especially for social media, and the trick is creating a look and feel that is right for you, your business and your market. Quirky close ups taken on a smartphone, plus filter is perfect for tagging on Instagram or sharing on Twitter. You can create a style for your images by asking yourself ‘what do I want to portray?’ – Piping hot eating on the go? Do you want the food to be sliced or whole, on its own or with other food items, with or without cutlery, napkins or drinks? Once you’ve created a style, be consistent and keep updating and social channels and your website to ensure your images are as fresh as your food.

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5. Buildings and interiors

It can be tricky to take photos in, or of, architecture – you quite often get a lens distortion, which our eyes correct to a certain extent, but can come out very strangely on an image (see comparison shots below). Of course you can embrace this style, it’s not uncommon, but moving as far away as possible so you are face-on to the building means that distortion is minimised. Photo editing tools such as aperture or ‘Lightroom’ can help correct this.

For interiors – such as hotel rooms - you’ll want to get as much of the space in the shot as possible. Using a wide-angle lens can help. Get as tight into a corner as you can capture as much of the room in as you can. Use a tripod or steady surface and a timer or remote ‘on’ switch so that you can put the ISO down as low as possible (e.g. 100 or 200), the aperture as wide as possible (e.g. f22) and the shutter speed as slow as possible (e.g. 1/30’). This all helps to get the maximum amount of light and space in the best possible focus.

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6. Animals and children

If your business involves either or both of the above, congratulations! I think these are the hardest subjects to capture.

Model release forms will be important if you are featuring children and/or members of the public and simple templates can be found online. Most people don’t mind if you ask them before you take their photo. Whilst it is not actually illegal to take a photo of a person if they are in a public space, I believe it is always better to ask permission.

For both animals and children, getting down to their level is a good start to avoid weird distortions or odd angles. Giving them something to do, such as play with a ball or run, will keep them focused and also help bring out their character and personality. And ensuring they are in a place where they will be relaxed and happy will certainly help to get the right shots. Above all, patience is key.

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7. Final considerations

Whatever the type of photography you need for your business, there are some general things to consider:

  • Where/how are the photos going to be used? This affects decisions on dimensions as well as file size. Your customers don’t want to wait for a minute while a large file downloads on a web page
  • Back up – keep the originals somewhere safe as it is heartbreaking to lose images and there are plenty of free and paid online cloud services available.
  • Don’t forget to share your photos on social media sites where you can engage with your clients and other prospects.
  • And remember, ‘the best camera is the one you have with you’ – always keep taking photos!

 

About Sam Lane

Samlane Limited is a photography services company providing a full range of commercial and social photography. Owner and Director, Sam Lane, brings over 20 years of marketing communications experience to the business and enjoys the challenge of working with clients to develop briefs and deliver images that showcase their brand, products or services in the best possible light. Sam has worked with the British Library on several projects and has attended events and workshops in the Business & IP Centre to continue to develop her skills as a business owner.

11 August 2016

How we amped-up our business strategy and our trading firm took off

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Amplify are a trading firm that provide training and expertise for those interested in moving into the financial markets to become a trader. They have pioneered a new training programme, raising the industry standard for trading talent. We asked them about their unique approach to trading and how they have established their high-regarded reputation in the industry.

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When was Amplify set up and what was it that inspired you to start the business?

We started Amplify in 2009 as a small trading firm in Canary Wharf. As we grew our team we wanted to create a new and better way to develop our new traders. Rather than relying on out-of-date models and theory, we wanted to revolutionise the way economics and finance were taught, using technology and experiential learning to make their training relevant to the markets today.

What challenges has the business faced along the way?

The industry is incredibly competitive and at first it was hard to make our mark. Reputation is everything, so we always tried to treat every person that has ever come into contact with Amplify with the upmost care and consideration.  This has meant growth has perhaps been slower than it could have been, but as we enter into our eighth year the hard work in building a reputation of quality and integrity is starting to pay off.

What has been the business’s biggest achievement so far?

Many of the world’s largest financial institutions, and some of the world’s most prestigious academic institutions, use our technology to perform better and this is great justification of the value of what we do.  It’s also excellent to see candidates that we have worked with landing some of the best roles in the industry, from central banks to hedge funds and investment banks. Receiving their feedback and seeing how well they have done is incredibly rewarding.

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What one piece of advice would you give to any business owners struggling to take their business to the next level?

As soon as you can, hire an employee to manage the operation that you have built so you can get on with helping it grow.

You were successful applicants on our Innovating for Growth programme – how has it helped you?

The sessions during the three-month programme gave us an invaluable reminder to refocus on the bigger picture, along with giving us the necessary tools to create value from that focus.  For us the most useful elements were redefining our business strategy and implementation; making sure the whole team is aware of the business objectives and core values of the firm, and that all involved are on board in helping to achieve those objectives.

Finally, what’s next on the horizon for Amplify?

Since the Innovating for Growth programme we have made our first hire abroad with our office in New York officially opening in September.  The co-founders have moved away from the London trading floor to be based in a separate location so we can be physically removed from the day-to-day running and focus on the growth objectives of the firm.  After New York opens in September, we start a road show in Hong Kong and Singapore this November.

 

Apply now for over £10,000 worth of business advice

Are you a start-up looking to scale up, like Amplify? Innovating for Growth is a fully funded three-month programme to help you turn your growth idea into a reality.

Covering everything from intellectual property to reaching new markets and branding, we'll guide you through every step of the way to help your business achieve its growth ambitions.

Find out more and apply now 

 

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The programme is fully-funded by the European Regional Development Fund and the British Library.

10 August 2016

How I took my business from a small start-up to a super success

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Arit Eminue started her business because she was passionate about giving young people opportunities to achieve their dreams no matter what their background, social class, gender or ethnicity.

Her business, DiVA, matches young talent with outstanding employers through government backed apprenticeships, giving people the opportunity to ‘earn while they learn’ and help businesses gain the skills they need to remain competitive.

Since the launch of the business in January 2011, DiVA have provided apprenticeships to over 200 creative youngsters with employers like 20th Century Fox, UK Music, Universal, Southbank Centre, Sadlers Wells, Crossrail and many more.

We caught up with founder and Director, Arit, to find out how she’s done it.

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Hi Arit! Where did the idea for your business come from?

We started delivering apprenticeships in 2011.  Before this, I had secured grant funding to provide a wage subsidy to film businesses hiring graduate talent.   At the time the entry route to the industry was through unpaid work placements, which the sector was trying to combat.  Our graduate programme addressed this issue, and was incredibly successful with a high number of graduates gaining full-time employment post-internship.

Low-cost recruitment worked, but the grant funding dried up.  Apprenticeships in the creative sector launched, essentially allowing businesses to recruit and train employees at a budget they could afford.  I enjoyed playing the “Fairy Job Mother”, matching the right candidates to the best role for them, so I switched focus to apprenticeship recruitment and training. We started with six apprentices and now have 150 young people currently engaged in apprenticeships, carrying out many jobs businesses depend on such as; general administrators, social media assistants, marketing assistants, HR administrators, receptionists and finance assistants.

What challenges did you face in the early stages?

Changing perceptions.  Apprenticeships were viewed as a poor alternative to a degree.  Employers had such low expectations of non-graduate talent, and thought hiring an apprentice was too complicated and it would take too long for an apprentice to get up to speed.  Having recruited graduate and non-graduate talent I can say with surety having a degree does not guarantee you’re work ready.

In addition to changing perceptions about apprenticeships, running a small business gives me an understanding of the pressures employers are under, so my team and I work hard to make their lives easier.  We take the headache out of recruitment by providing a full service. We submit grant funding applications and have all paperwork and training schedules issued up front so there are no surprises.    We’re also at the other end of a phone throughout the process and beyond. 

What has been DiVA’s biggest achievement so far?

Still being in business five years down the line - with not a grey hair in sight!  Also we have a very high conversion rate from an apprenticeship into full-time employment and each time this happens I’m reminded that apprenticeships do work.  

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You grew the business with the help of our Innovating for Growth programme. What specifically did the programme help you achieve?

The Innovating for Growth programme helped me to develop my team in line with my plans for growth.  The programme also helped increase our client base.  I had previously focussed on creative companies as opposed to creative occupations (e.g. marketing and communications), which are in any sector.  Being encouraged to shift my thinking in this regard helped broaden our reach and attract non-creative businesses such as the CBI, Hackney Council, Greenwich Council and JJ Roofing. 

What one piece of advice would you give to any business owners struggling to take their business to the next level?

Scheduling one day per week to work on the business (rather than just in it) was the best piece of advice I was given, so it seems only fair to share it.  Admittedly, it wasn’t an easy habit to adopt. However, forcing myself to do it has paid dividends. Also, apply for Innovating for Growth and let experts give you the help you need to succeed – it doesn’t cost you or your business anything other than your time.

 

Apply now for over £10,000 worth of business advice

Are you a start-up looking to scale up, like DiVA? Innovating for Growth is a free three-month programme to help you turn your growth idea into a reality.

Covering everything from intellectual property to reaching new markets and branding, we'll guide you through every step of the process.

Find out more and apply now 

 

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The programme is fully-funded by the European Regional Development Fund and the British Library.

 

29 July 2016

A finger on the pulse of sustainable food business

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At the Business & IP Centre we frequently help customers starting and growing food related businesses.    

2016 is the International Year of Pulses 

This year two sustainable food topics have caught my attention. We are halfway through the UN’s International Year of Pulses (IYP2016) to 'position pulses as a primary source of protein and other essential nutrients'. And secondly, the growth in the consumption of insects as a nutritious source of food, or entomophagy to give its official name. I recently helped two examples of start-up businesses using the Business & IP Centre creating innovative food products with insects.  

 

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Source Wikipedia

 

 

The IYP 2016 portal aims to heighten public awareness of nutritional benefits of pulses as a superfood. The hope is that it will result in sustainable food production, global food security and better nutrition for a growing world population. This site showcases ways in which we can ‘Love Pulses’ (see Twitter hashtag #LovePulses) with food competitions, recipes, photo gallery and a whole lot of inspiration to get your pulses racing.

 

Lebanese_style_hummus
Source Wikipedia

 

 

Only 6% of UK adults consider themselves vegetarians

According to Mintel report Menu Flavours 2016 (available in the Business & IP Centre) only 6% of UK adults consider themselves vegetarians, while '54% of diners say that they enjoy dishes which contain a lot of vegetables'. Mintel puts this down to using 'new interesting flavours and methods'.  This is great news for pulses, and certainly over the last ten years we have all seen a growth in by-products such as hummus, falafel and bean burgers. 

 

Mintel chart
Figure 24: Selected behaviours relating to healthy eating, by age, November 2015 Base: 2,000 internet users aged 16+
Mintel Report - Attitudes Towards Healthy Eating February 2016

 

 

 

There are innovative examples on IYP2016 of new product developments by young entrepreneurs, such as the award winning Crisps made from Lupin flowers by Charlotte Reynolds, ice cream from bean milk, bean jam etc. 

 

Now that I have convinced you to eat more pulses I am also going tempt you with the insect protein market.  London South Bank University is championing entomophagy and suggests we can introduce it in our diet for food sustainability. You may squirm at insects in our diet, but we once had the same feelings about lobster, prawns and even sushi, before they became acceptable in our Western diet.

Insects could solve the problem of world food sustainability

Lobsters were once called ‘cockroaches of the sea’, and were cheap to buy. There are a few reports on the market for insects such as Canadean’s ‘Foresight: Edible Insects’. Insects are seen by food experts and nutritionists as a solution because they are more sustainable than other food sources. For example, insects do not require a lot of land to farm, and edible insects are more protein-dense then beef. 

There are some countries and societies who are large consumers of insects, apparently the Bodo tribe in Northern India have long traditions and celebrations of insects as part of their diet. Research by insect production company Chapul also finds that 80% of countries around the world have insects on the menu one way or another. There are apparently two billion people who already eat insects with over two thousand species of insects considered to be ‘edible’.  Chapul’s e-commerce store is selling cricket powder and cricket bars online. Closer to home, there is Grub selling protein bars with cricket flour.

 

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www.eatgrub.co.uk

Paradigm shift required

The two businesses I met in the Centre were on the cutting edge of food technology with their use of insects. They were well aware of the paradigm shift that would be required to reach a mainstream customer base. which such innovative products that are not in our diet currently. Both businesses thought that the Television program ‘I’m a Celebrity get me out of here’ was something of a double-edged sword in promoting entomophagy. It is good for exposing edible insects but also may be a turn-off for some audiences. 

However for businesses like these, it would certainly be rewarding and satisfying to win Western consumers over and change behaviour on eating insects.  One of the strategies discussed is to engage with the younger generation who are generally more experimental, and who also want to actively change the world for the better. One example of this is at the Shambala Festival, where in 2016 they have made a meat and fish free policy, but they do have an insect bar.

I haven’t yet  eaten insects knowingly, but I am certainly a pulses fan and incorporate it in my diet. Be it pulses, insects or something else innovative in the market. This really is an opportunity for us to try new sustainable ingredients and hopefully help towards more sustainable food production, technology and market.

Written by Seema Rampersad

 

19 May 2016

Kikka Digga - Business & IP Centre Success Story

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Kikka-Digga logoOn Saturday I visited Plumpton College near Lewes, for their annual open day. On display amongst the new-born lambs, Sussex wines, tractors and chainsaws was a stand for Kikka Digga. With my curiosity for all things new, I sauntered over and chatted to the demonstrator Nick Skaliotis. It turned out this was the very first public outing for the his new invention, which he claimed would make digging gardens significantly easier.

Mid-way through our conversation I asked if Nick had patented his invention, he looked more closely at me and said, "I know you". It turned out he has been a regular in the Business & IP Centre at the British Library. In addition to getting help with his patent from our wonderful Inventor in Residence Mark Shehean. He also attended several of our workshops including lean start-up webinar, social media for business and trade marks.

Kikka-Digga image
After hearing Nick’s story I just had to buy his product to see if it really did live up to his claims. Also, I hoped it would help me to avoid the lower back-pain I now get every time I dig over my vegetable patch.

As soon as I got home I took the two pieces of metal out of package and installed them onto my fork. This was as simple as the instructions indicated with just two items to clamp onto my fork.

As you can see from my photos below, I was able to dig over a small section of my very weedy heavy clay soil quickly and easily using Kikka Digga. And, even better, I had no twinges in my lower back afterwards. So I am definitely sold on the product.

I also like the name Kikka Digga, for being simple and memorable. And it has even more k’s than the legendary Kodak brand. George Eastman said about the letter k, “it seems a strong, incisive sort of letter.” I am also glad to see that Nick has registered the name at the UK Intellectual Property Office.

Kikka Digga trademark

You can see a demonstration of the invention in action on YouTube. And keep up to date with Nick’s progress on Facebook or Twitter.

I can’t wait to see how the gardeners of Great Britain take to this wonderful invention.

Kikka Digga 1

Kikka Digga newly assembled on my fork in seconds

Kikka Digga 2

My first few digs into my heavy clay soil are surprisingly easy

Kikka Digga 3

Misty is as impressed as I am by the speed and ease in digging up the plot.

 

By Neil Infield in the Business & IP Centre London team