THE BRITISH LIBRARY

Digital scholarship blog

Enabling innovative research with British Library digital collections

Introduction

Tracking exciting developments at the intersection of libraries, scholarship and technology. Read more

11 August 2017

Last Chance to Book for Game Library Camp Tomorrow

Tomorrow afternoon is Game Library Camp here at the British Library. So if you are in or near London, and are interested in libraries and games (all types of games, including board games, table top roleplaying, live action roleplaying (though please don't bring any foam replica weapons!), videogames, interactive fiction etc.), then please book a free place from https://gamelibcamp.eventbrite.co.uk.

The event is happening on Saturday 12 August, 12:30 to 16:30, at the Knowledge Centre, The British Library, 96 Euston Rd, London, NW1 2DB. For info on how to get here, go to https://www.bl.uk/aboutus/quickinfo/loc/stp. Please note lunch is not provided, but there are cafés on site, or bring your own snacks. We'll be using #GameLibCamp17 to discuss the event on Twitter etc.

image from https://s3.amazonaws.com/feather-client-files-aviary-prod-us-east-1/2017-08-11/c9eac854-6ad0-4e23-ab9f-f766f43cf7d1.png

At a library camp the participants lead the agenda – in fact, there isn’t an agenda until attendees pitch (bad tent pun, groan!) and decide what they’d like to talk about at the start of the event.  The only requirement for a session is that it fits within the theme. If you already have an idea for a talk, discussion, game or activity; you can propose your suggestion beforehand on this page http://gamesandglams.blogspot.co.uk/p/game-library-camp-sessions.html. We'll have the use of a number of rooms at the British Library's Knowledge Centre, so will be able to run a few sessions in parallel during the event. Also, please do bring games along if you want to run a game! - this is totally encouraged.

Programme:

  • Registration from 12 noon
  • Introduction and session pitches 12:30pm
  • 1st session 1pm - 1:40pm
  • 2nd session 1:45pm - 2:25pm
  • 3rd session 2:30pm - 3:10pm
  • 4th session 3:15pm - 3:55pm
  • Closing session 4pm
  • Finish by 4:30pm
  • Post-event social meetup at The Somers Town Coffee House

In the words of experienced Library Campers Sue Lawson and Richard Veevers who run the http://www.librarycamp.co.uk website: "there's no cost, there are no keynotes and library camp is open to anyone: public/private/whatever sector and you don't have to work in a library".

This specific library camp is intended as a warm up to International Games Week in the autumn and to inspire librarians and library staff from all sectors to host their own game events. We also totally welcome colleagues from, and people who visit, other cultural heritage organisations, museums, archives etc. who participate in games projects and events, both game making and game playing.  

Furthermore, if you are interested, but you can't attend tomorrow, I recommend joining the online discussion group Games & GLAMS set up by British Library collaborator, Sarah Cole, that focuses on game related activities in the Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums sector. It's open to anyone with an interest in games in any of these areas. There is also an associated Games & GLAMS Twitter account: @Games_GLAMS.

This post is by Digital Curator Stella Wisdom, on twitter as @miss_wisdom. Stella is co-organising Game Library Camp with Darren Edwards of Bournemouth Libraries and the lead on International Games Week in the UK, and Gary Green from Surrey Libraries.

04 August 2017

BL Labs Awards (2017): enter before midnight Tuesday 11th October!

Posted by Mahendra Mahey, Manager of of British Library Labs.

The BL Labs Awards formally recognises outstanding and innovative work that has been created using the British Library’s digital collections and data.

The closing date for entering the BL Labs Awards (2017) is midnight BST on Tuesday 11th October. So please submit your entry and/or help us spread the word to all interested and relevant parties over the next few months or so. This will ensure we have another year of fantastic digital-based projects highlighted by the Awards!

This year, the BL Labs Awards is commending work in four key areas:

  • Research - A project or activity which shows the development of new knowledge, research methods, or tools.
  • Commercial - An activity that delivers or develops commercial value in the context of new products, tools, or services that build on, incorporate, or enhance the Library's digital content.
  • Artistic - An artistic or creative endeavour which inspires, stimulates, amazes and provokes.
  • Teaching / Learning - Quality learning experiences created for learners of any age and ability that use the Library's digital content.

After the submission deadline of midnight BST on Tuesday 11th October for entering the BL Labs Awards has past, the entries will be shortlisted. Selected shortlisted entrants will be notified via email by midnight BST on Friday 20th October 2017. 

A prize of £500 will be awarded to the winner and Â£100 to the runner up of each Awards category at the BL Labs Symposium on 30th October 2017 at the British Library, St Pancras, London.

The talent of the BL Labs Awards winners and runners ups of 2016 and 2015 has led to the production a remarkable and varied collection of innovative projects. In 2016, the Awards commended work in four main categories – Research, Creative/Artistic and Entrepreneurship:

  • Research category Award (2016) winner: 'Scissors and Paste', by M. H. Beals. Scissors and Paste utilises the 1800-1900 digitised British Library Newspapers, collection to explore the possibilities of mining large-scale newspaper databases for reprinted and repurposed news content.
  • Artistic Award (2016) winner: 'Hey There, Young Sailor', written and directed by Ling Low with visual art by Lyn Ong. Hey There, Young Sailor combines live action with animation, hand-drawn artwork and found archive images to tell a love story set at sea. The video draws on late 19th century and early 20th century images from the British Library's Flickr collection for its collages and tableaux and was commissioned by Malaysian indie folk band The Impatient Sisters and independently produced by a Malaysian and Indonesian team.
BL Labs Award Winners 2016
Image: 'Scissors and Paste', by M. H. Beals (Top-left)
'Curating Digital Collections to Go Mobile', by Mitchell Davis; (Top-right)
 'Hey There, Young Sailor',
written and directed by Ling Low with visual art by Lyn Ong; (Bottom-left)
'Library Carpentry', founded by James Baker and involving the international Library Carpentry team;
(Bottom-right) 
  • Commercial Award (2016) winner: 'Curating Digital Collections to Go Mobile', by Mitchell Davis. BiblioBoard, is an award-winning e-Content delivery platform, and online curatorial and multimedia publishing tools to support it to make it simple for subject area experts to create visually stunning multi-media exhibits for the web and mobile devices without any technical expertise, the example used a collection of digitised 19th Century books.
  • Teaching and Learning (2016) winner: 'Library Carpentry', founded by James Baker and involving the international Library Carpentry team. Library Carpentry is software skills training aimed at the needs and requirements of library professionals taking the form of a series of modules that are available online for self-directed study or for adaption and reuse by library professionals in face-to-face workshops using British Library data / collections. Library Carpentry is in the commons and for the commons: it is not tied to any institution or person. For more information, see http://librarycarpentry.github.io/.
  • Jury’s Special Mention Award (2016): 'Top Geo-referencer -Maurice Nicholson' . Maurice leads the effort to Georeference over 50,000 maps that were identified through Flickr Commons, read more about his work here.

For any further information about BL Labs or our Awards, please contact us at labs@bl.uk.

27 July 2017

A workshop on Optical Character Recognition for Bangla

I was fortunate enough to travel to Kolkata recently along with other members of the Two Centuries of Indian Print team where we ran a workshop on ‘Developments with Optical Character Recognition for Bangla’. The event, which took place at Jadavpur University, proved an excellent forum to share knowledge in this area of growing interest and was reflected in the range of library professionals, academics and computer scientists who attended from ten institutions across Bengal and from the US.

Applying Optical Character Recognition (OCR) to printed texts is one of the key expectations of 21st century scholars and library users, who want to quickly find information online that accurately meets their research needs. Cultural institutions are gateways to millions of items containing knowledge that can transform modern research. The workshop looked at the developments, challenges and opportunities of OCR in opening up vast quantities of knowledge to digital researchers.

Dr. Naira Khan from the University of Dhaka’s Computational Linguistics department kicked off the workshop by introducing the key process of how OCR works, including ‘pre-processing’ steps such as binarisation which reduces a scanned page of text to its binary form to remove background noise, isolating only the text on the page. Skew detection, another pre-processing technique, corrects scans with angular text that can cause problems for OCR systems that require perfectly horizontal or vertical text. Dr. Khan moved on to explain how OCR systems segment pages into text and non-text regions right down to pixel detection to recognise word boundaries. When it comes down to recognising individual characters, Bangla script presents some unique challenges, containing such a vast range of compound characters, vowel signs and ligatures, not to mention the distinctive top line connecting characters known as the ‘Matra’. Breaking the characters into their geometric features such as lines, arcs and circles enables combinations of features to be formed, classified as characters and expressed in digital form as OCR output.  

Naira_blog_imageadjustment

Dr. Khan introducing the concepts of OCR

After Dr. Khan’s inspiring talk attendees learned of the British Library’s particular challenge searching for an OCR solution for our 19th century Bengali books currently being digitised, and the potential use of an OCR’d dataset for Digital Humanities researchers wanting to perform text and data mining. The books span an enormous range of genres from works by religious missionaries, to those covering food, science and works of fiction. So obtaining OCR would enable automated searching and analysis of the full text across hundreds of thousands of pages that could lead to exciting research discoveries in South Asian studies.   

The event concluded with a practical session during which attendees used different OCR software on a sample of the BL’s digitised Bengali books. They experimented with Tesseract, Google Drive, i2ocr and newOCR. The general consensus was Google Drive proved to be the most accurate! Although, there are other tools we have only just begun to try out such as Transkribus that may be useful.

PracticalExercise_blogWorkshop participants trying out various OCR tools

All-in-all the workshop proved a really worthwhile exercise in widening knowledge among Indian institutions about the challenges and possible uses of OCR for Bangla. The work currently being undertaken by universities and technology centres using state-of-the-art machine learning techniques to perform text recognition will hopefully close the gap between Bangla (as well as other Indic scripts) and Latin scripts when it comes to efficient OCR tools.

 

This is a post by Tom Derrick, Digital Curator for the Two Centuries of Indian Print project.