THE BRITISH LIBRARY

Digital scholarship blog

15 posts categorized "Research collaboration"

28 June 2017

Ambient Literature

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Does where you read affect how you read?

How can digital media create a bridge between story and place?

Ambient Literature is a project seeking to answer these questions.  This is an interdisciplinary collaboration between the University of West England, Bath Spa University and the University of Birmingham, investigating how situated storytelling is changing through pervasive and ubiquitous computing. Drawing on literary studies, creative writing, design, human-computer interaction, performance and new media studies it is examining emergent forms of literature; challenging the locational and technological future of the book.

Forming the heart of the project, three authors; Kate Pullinger, James Attlee and Duncan Speakman are each creating new experimental works that respond to the presence of a reader, and aim to show how we can redefine the rules of the reading experience through the use of technology.

The first of these works to be made available is "It Must Have Been Dark By Then" by Duncan Speakman, this is an audio walk, within which each reader is invited to reflect on their fragile relationship with the world around us. Field recordings and stories from the edge of the Sahara, abandoned Latvian villages, and the disappearing swamplands of Louisiana weave into the audience’s drift through a landscape both familiar and foreign. 

Here at the British Library we are delighted to be hosting sessions for members of the public to experience this work. These will be taking place 4-8 July 2017; to book a free place go to http://www.bl.uk/events/it-must-have-been-dark-by-then. Participants will need to bring their own smartphones (iOS or Android), but headphones and instructions will be provided. 

Furthermore, on 5 July 2017, we are hosting an evening panel discussion about the relationships between digital technology, location and literature. Join Ambient Literature project leader Tom Abba and writers Kate Pullinger, James Attlee and Duncan Speakman for a fascinating event talking about location-based reading experiences using pervasive technology, which respond to the reader and use digital media as a bridge between story and place. To book your place, go to https://www.bl.uk/events/ambient-literature-panel-discussion. Hope to see you there.

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Ambient Literature writers: Kate Pullinger, Duncan Speakman and James Attlee

This post is by Digital Curator Stella Wisdom, on twitter as @miss_wisdom and member of the Ambient Literature Advisory Board.

16 May 2017

Michael Takeo Magruder @ Gazelli Art House

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Posted by Mahendra Mahey (Manager of BL Labs) on behalf of Michael Takeo Magruder (BL Labs Artist/Researcher in Residence).

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Michael Takeo Marguder's Gazell.io works

Earlier this year I was invited by Gazelli Art House to be a digital artist-in-residence on their online platform Gazell.io. After a series of conversations with Gazelli’s director, Mila Askarova, we decided it would be a perfect opportunity to broker a partnership with British Library Labs and use the occasion to publish some of the work-in-progress ideas from my Imaginary Cities project at the British Library.

Given Gazelli’s growing interest in and reputation for exhibiting virtual reality (VR) art, we chose to launch my March showcase with A New Jerusalem since it was in many ways the inspiration for the Imaginary Cities concept.

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A New Jerusalem by Michael Takeo Magruder

During the second half of my Gazell.io residency I began publishing various aesthetic-code studies that had been created for the Imaginary Cities project. I was also invited by Gazelli to hold a private sharing event at their London gallery in Mayfair to showcase some of the project’s physical experiments and outcomes. The evening was organised by Gazelli’s Artist Liaison, Victoria Al-Din, and brought together colleagues from the British Library, art curators from leading cultural institutions and academics connected to media art practice. It was a wonderful event, and it was incredibly useful to be able to present my ideas and the resulting artistic-technical prototypes to a group with such a deep and broad range of expertise. 


Sharing works in progress for the Imaginary Cities project at Gazelli Art House, London. 30th March 2017

12 April 2017

New technologies challenging author and reader roles

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This a guest post is by Carol Butler introducing her PhD topic, you can follow her on twitter as @fantomascarol.

New technologies are challenging the traditional view of what it is to be an author or a reader. A range of digital tools are used by readers and authors to ask each other questions, share interpretations and knowledge, and to socialise.

I am a Collaborative Doctoral Partnership student based at the British Library (BL) and City, University Of London, supervised by Ian Cooke at the BL, and Dr Stephann Makri at City. My research explores how online social networking technologies enable authors and readers to interact in ways that were previously not possible. I am interested in how this can impact understanding of a written work, and how it can shape an author’s ongoing or future work.

Authors and readers have always sought to better their understanding of a written work- and of each other- by exchanging questions and feedback. However, historically, their communications have been mediated through a hierarchical chain, for example through letters sent privately via an author’s agent. Constrained by process, available technology and geography, this has also largely only possible after a finished work has been published. Interaction has therefore been somewhat slow and limited.

There are now digital tools for reading-related activities used by authors and readers alike, for example GoodReads, which is for writing reviews and cataloguing books. With these tools, communities discuss their reading, partake in competitions and also share their writing. In some, an author may use reader feedback to develop writing in progress, which may be published as a working draft, rather than a final artefact. Authors can also field questions from their readers - either as an ongoing open communication channel, or in a timed Q&A session (an example of this can be seen here).

Other tools, such as Genius, support discussion about a text directly on top of it, through digital annotations. An example can be seen here, where a scene from Shakespeare’s Hamlet has been annotated line by line, with readers sharing their interpretations and providing links to external reading. Also here, the author has annotated his own work (in green), to offer deeper contextual understanding to the reader.

However, as well as purpose-made tools, communities also use ones that were intended for different purposes, such as social media sites, e.g. Twitter. People also do not always confine their behaviour to any one tool, and so an activity starting in one tool may often bleed into, repeat, or further develop in another.

A useful example of how readers meander between multiple tools can be found here, where a reader describes his process for reading a physical book- a task supported by checking in with a range of tools and social networks.

A symbiotic relationship between tools and behaviour means that technology evolves in response to how it is used. However, with reader and author activity dispersed across multiple tools, often contrary to a tools intended purpose, and over fluctuating periods of time, this usage cannot be readily observed or understood.

By ascertaining where, how and why readers and authors interact with each other and the tools, I hope to better understand their needs and behaviours. I will investigate how interaction behaviour is mediated, hindered by, and at times resultant of this technology. My intent is to develop theory to explain their behaviour which I can use to provide design guidelines for future tools, to help better support their needs. I will also be looking at what types of works, ways of working and publishing trends emerge from this use of technology, and the challenges posed for the British Library in collecting and preserving them.

I will shortly be conducting interviews with authors and readers to begin to unveil both their motivations for interacting in this manner, and their experiences with doing so.  

I would be happy to speak to anyone with an interest in this area, either by email or in person, so feel free to contact me (carol.butler@bl.uk).

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The traditional view of reader and author roles- where the reader only sees a finished artefact, isolated from the drafts and processes that formed it - is challenged by readers’ increasingly participatory involvement prior to publication.

28 March 2017

Mobile devices meet author, text, and reader

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This a guest post is by Alastair Horne introducing his PhD topic, you can follow him on twitter as @pressfuturist, and also on Instagram.

I’m a collaborative doctoral partnership student based here at the British Library and at Bath Spa University, supervised jointly by Stella Wisdom here, and Professor Kate Pullinger at Bath. In my research, I’m exploring how one of the most disruptive technologies of the past few decades – the ubiquitous mobile computing device, in the form of the smartphone or tablet computer – is changing the relationship between author, text, and reader.

Taking the launch of the original iPhone in 2007 as my starting point, I’m looking at the influence of mobile devices in two complementary areas. The first part of my research considers ‘mobile fictions’: narratives written specifically for smartphones and tablets; stories which build on the possibilities generated by such devices for new kinds of storytelling. The second explores how the social media platforms most commonly used on mobile devices – particularly Twitter and Facebook – offer opportunities for widespread, intense, and sustained interaction between authors and readers. Alongside those two areas of research, I’m also working on a creative project that will put many of the ideas explored in my research into practice: a short mobile audio fiction to be experienced over the course of a ten-minute walk through Brompton Cemetery.

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Brompton Cemetery's secret time machine, copyright Alastair Horne

Issues around collecting and digital preservation are central to all three strands of my research, which is why I’m delighted to be based in the British Library and to have the chance to learn from – and ultimately, I hope, to contribute to – practice here. I’ll be considering how we might archive smartphone apps when so many are abandoned by their developers, left broken and unusable by updates to their operating systems – while others end up entirely deleted, so that the only evidence of their existence is a few reviews and the occasional broken link to an appstore. I’ll also be exploring how we can preserve the conversations that take place on social media. Furthermore, I’ll be attempting to put these learnings into practice – and establish some best practices – when exploring archiving my own creative project. 

21 December 2016

Mobius programme – on the beach of learning

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This guest post is by Virve Miettinen, who spent four months with various teams at the British Library.

Every morning there’s a 100 meter queue in front of the British Library. It seems to say a lot about an unashamed nerdiness and love for learning in this city. Usually all the queuers have already put the things they might need in the Reading Room in a clear plastic bag, so they can head straight down to the lockers, stow away their coats, handbags and laptop cases and secure a place on the beach of learning.

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Virve Miettinen

The Mobius fellowship programme, organised by the Finnish Institute in London, enables mobility for visual arts, museum, library and archives professionals, and customised working periods as part of the host organisation’s staff, in my case the British Library. The programme is a great opportunity to break away from daily routines, to think about one’s professional identity, find fresh ideas, compare the practices and methods between two countries, share knowledge and build meaningful networks.

Learn, relearn and unlearn from each other

Learning isn’t a destination, it’s a never-ending road of discovery, challenge, inspiration and wonder. Each learning moment builds character, shapes thoughts, guides futures. But what makes us learn? For me the answer is other people, and during the Mobius Fellowship I’ve been blessed with the chance to work with talented people willing to share their knowledge at the British Library.

I’ve familiarised myself with British Library Learning Team which is responsible for the library’s engagement with all kinds of learners. The Learning Team offers workshops, activities and resources for schools, teachers and learners of all ages.

I’ve been following the work of the Digital Scholarship team and BL Labs project to learn more about the incredible digital collections the library has to offer, and how to open them up for the public through various activities such as competitions, events and projects.

I’ve worked with the Knowledge Quarter, which is a network of now 76 partners within a one mile radius of Kings Cross and who actively create and disseminate knowledge. Partners include over 49 academic, cultural, research, scientific and media organisations large and small: from the British Library and University of the Arts London to the School of Life, Connected Digital Economy Catapult, Francis Crick Institute and Google.

I’ve assisted the Library’s Community Engagement Manager Emma Morgan. She has been working as a community engagement manager for six months now and the aim of her work is to create meaningful, long-lasting, mutually beneficial relationships with the surrounding community, i.e. residents, networks and organisations.

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Inside the British Library

I’ve observed the library’s marketing and communications unit in action, and learned for example how they measure and research the customer experience, i.e. who visits and uses the BL, what they think of their experience and how the BL might improve it.

 

I’ve got many 'mental souvenirs' to take back home with me - if they interest you, read more from my Mobius blog: http://itssupercalafragilistic.tumblr.com/. 

100 digital stories about Finnish-British relations

As part of the Mobius programme I’ve been working on a co-operative project between the British Library, the National Library in Finland, the Finnish National Archives, The Finnish Institute in London and the Finnish Embassy. In the last three decades, contacts between Finland and UK, the two relatively distant nations have multiplied. At the same time, the network of cultural relationships has tightened into a seamless 'love-story' – something that would not have been easy to predict just 50 years ago. In the coming year of 2017 the Finnish Institute celebrates the centennial anniversary of Finland’s independence by telling the story of two nations – the aim is to make the history, the interaction and the links between these two countries tangible and visible.

We are collaborating to create a digital gallery open to all, which offers its visitors carefully curated pieces of the shared history of the two countries and their political, cultural and economic relations. It will offer new information on the relations and influences between the two countries. It consists of digitised historical materials, like letters, news, cards, photographs, tickets and maps. The British Library and other partners will select 100 digitised items to create the basis of the gallery.

The gallery will be expanded further through co-creation. In the spirit of the theme of Finland’s centenary 'together', the gallery is open to all and easily accessible. With the call 'Wanted – make your own heritage' we invite people to share their own stories and interpretations, and record history through them. The gallery feeds curiosity, creates interaction and engages users to share their own memories relating to Finnish-British experiences. The users are invited to interpret recent history from a personal point of view.

The work continues after my Mobius-period and the gallery will open in September 2017. Join us and share your memories. Be frank, withdrawn, furious, imaginative, witty or sad. Through your story you create history.

P.S. The British Library Reading Room is actually far from The Beach of Learning, it’s more like The Coolest Place To Be, I found myself freezing in the air-conditioned Rare Books Reading Room despite wearing my leather jacket and extra pair of leggings

Virve Miettinen is working at Helsinki City Library/ Central Library as a participation planner. Her job is to engage citizens and partners to design the library of the future. For Helsinki City Library co-operative planning and service design means designing the premises and services together with the library users while taking advantage of user centric methods. Her interests involve co-design, service design, community engagement and community-led city development. At the moment she is also working with her PhD under the title 'Co-creative practices in library services'.

16 December 2016

Re-imagining a catalogue of illuminated manuscripts - from search to browse

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In this guest post, Thomas Evans discusses his work with Digital Curator Dr Mia Ridge to re-imagine the interface to the British Library's popular Online Catalogue of Illuminated manuscripts.

The original Catalogue was built using an Access 2003 database, and allows users to create detailed searches from amongst 20 fields (such as date, title, origin, and decoration) or follow 'virtual exhibitions' to view manuscripts. Search-based interfaces can be ideal for specialists who already know what they're looking for, but the need to think of a search term likely to yield interesting results can be an issue for people unfamiliar with a catalogue. 'Generous interfaces' are designed as rich, browsable experiences that highlight the scope and composition of a particular collection by loading the page with images linked to specific items or further categories. Mia asked Thomas to apply faceted browsing and 'generous' styles to help first-time visitors discover digitised illuminated manuscripts. In this post Thomas explains the steps he took to turn the catalogue data supplied into a more 'generous' browsing interface. An archived version of his interface is available on the Internet Archive.

With over 4,300 manuscripts, written in a variety of languages and created in countries across Europe over a period of about a thousand years, the British Library's collection of illuminated manuscripts contains a diverse treasure trove of information and imagery for both the keen enthusiast and the total novice.

As the final project for my Masters in Computer Science at UCL, I worked with the British Library to design and start to implement alternative ways of exploring the collection. This project had some constraints in time, knowledge and resources. The final deadline for submission was only four months after receiving the project outline and the success of the project rested on the knowledge, experience and research of a fresh-faced rookie (me) using whatever tools I had the wherewithal to cobble together (open source software running on a virtual machine server hosted by UCL).

Rather than showing visitors an empty search box when they first arrive, a generous interface will show them everything available. However, taken literally, displaying 'everything' means details for over 4,300 manuscripts and around 40,000 images would have to be displayed on one page. While this approach would offer visitors a way to explore the entire catalogue, it could be quite unwieldy.

One way to reduce the number of manuscripts loaded onto the screen is to allow visitors to filter out some items, for example limiting the 'date' field to between 519 and 927 or the 'region' field to England. This is 'faceted' browsing, and it makes exploration more manageable. Presenting the list of available values for region or language, etc., also gives you a sense of the collection's diversity. It also means that 'quirky' members of the collection are less likely to be overlooked.

Screenshot of filters in Thomas CIM interface II
An example of 'date' facets providing an instant overview of the temporal range of the Catalogue

For example, if you were to examine 30 random manuscripts from the British Library's collection, you might find 20 written in Latin, three each in French and English, and perhaps one each in Greek, Hebrew or Italian. You would almost certainly miss that the Catalogue contains a manuscript written in Cornish, another in Portuguese and another in Icelandic. These languages might be of interest precisely because they are hard to come by in the British Library's catalogue. Listing all the available languages (as well as their frequencies) exposes the exceptional parts of the collection where an unfaceted generous interface would hide them in plain sight.

Once I understood the project's goals and completed some high-level planning and design sketches, it was time to get to grips with implementation. Being fairly inexperienced, I found some tasks took much longer than expected. A few examples which stick in the mind are properly configuring the web server, debugging errant server-side scripts (which have a habit of failing either silently or with an unhelpful error message) and transforming Library's database into a form which I could use.

Being the work of many hands over the years, the database inevitably contained some tiny differences in the way entries were recorded, which Mia informs me is not uncommon for a long-standing database in a collecting institution. These small inconsistencies - for example, the use of an en-dash in some cases and a hyphen in others - look fine to us, but confuse a computer. I worked around these where I could, 'cleaning' the records only when I was certain of my correction.

Being new to web design, I built the interface iteratively, component by component, consulting periodically with Mia for feedback. Thankfully, frameworks exist for responsive web design and page templating. Nevertheless, there was a small learning curve and some thought was required to properly separate application logic from presentation logic.

There were some ambitions for the project which were ultimately not pursued due to time (and knowledge!) constraints, but this iterative process made other improvements possible over the course of my project. To make exploration of the catalogue easier, the page listing a manuscript's details also contained links to related manuscripts. For instance, Ioannes Rhosos is attributed as the scribe of Harley 5699, so, on that manuscript's page, users could click on his name to see a list of all manuscripts by him. They could then apply further filters if desired. This made links between manuscripts much more clear than the old interface, but it is limited to direct links which were explicitly recorded in the database.

An example of a relevant feature not explicitly recorded in the database is genre - only by reading manuscript descriptions can you determine whether it is religious, historical, medical etc. in its subject matter. Two possible techniques for revealing such features were considered: applying natural language processing to manuscript descriptions in order to classify them, or analysing data about which manuscripts were viewed by which users to build a recommendation system. Both of these turned out to require more in-depth knowledge than I was able to acquire within the time limit of the project.

I enjoyed working out how to transform all the possible inputs to the webpage into queries which could be run against the database, dealing with missing/invalid inputs by providing appropriate defaults etc. There was a quiet satisfaction to be had when tests of the interface went well - seeing something work and thinking 'I made that!'. It was also a pleasure to work with data about such an engaging topic.

Hopefully, this project will have proved that exploration of British Library's Catalogue of Illuminated Manuscripts has the potential to become a richer experience. Relationships between manuscripts which are currently not widely known could be revealed to more visitors and, if the machine learning techniques were to be implemented, perhaps new relationships would be revealed and related manuscripts could be recommended. My project showed the potential for applying new computational methods to better reveal the character of collections and connections between their elements. Although the interface I delivered has some way to go before it can achieve this goal, I earnestly hope that it is a first step in that direction.

Thomas' Catalogue interface
Thomas' Catalogue interface

14 November 2016

British Library Labs Symposium 2016 - Competition and Award runners up

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The 4th annual British Library Labs Symposium was held on 7th November 2016, and the event was a great success in celebrating and showcasing Digital Scholarship and highlighting the work of BL Labs and their collaborators. The exciting day included the announcement of the winners of the BL Labs Competition and BL Labs Awards, as well as of the runners up who are presented in this blog post. Posts written by all of the winners and runners up about their work are also scheduled for the next few weeks - watch this space!

BL Labs Competition finalist for 2016
Roly Keating, Chief Executive of the British Library announced that the runner up of the two finalists of the BL Labs Competition for 2016 was...

Black Abolitionist Performances and their Presence in Britain
By Hannah-Rose Murray (PhD student at the University of Nottingham)

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Roly Keating, Chief Executive of the British Library, welcoming Hannah-Rose Murray on to the stage.

The project focuses on African American lives, experiences and lectures in Britain between 1830–1895. By assessing black abolitionist speeches in the British Library’s nineteenth-century newspaper collection and using the British Library’s Flickr Commons 1 million collection. to illustrate, the project has illuminated their performances and how their lectures reached nearly every corner of Britain. For the first time, the location of these meetings has been mapped and the number and scale of the lectures given by black abolitionists in Britain has been evaluated, allowing their hidden voices to be heard and building a more complete picture of Victorian London for us. Hannah-Rose has recently posted an update about her work and the project findings can also be found on her website: www.frederickdouglassinbritain.com.

RoseHannah-Rose Murray is a second year PhD student with the Department of American and Canadian Studies, University of Nottingham. Her AHRC/M3C-funded PhD focuses on the legacy of formerly enslaved African Americans on British society and the different ways they fought British racism. Hannah-Rose received a first class Masters degree in Public History from Royal Holloway University and has a BA History degree from University College London (UCL). In Nottingham, Hannah-Rose works closely with the Centre for Research in Race and Rights and is one of the postgraduate directors of the Rights and Justice Research Priority Area, which includes the largest number of scholars (700) in the world working on rights and justice.

BL Labs Awards runners up for 2016

Research Award runner up
Allan Sudlow, Head of Research Development at the British Library announced that the runner up of the Research Award was...

Nineteenth-century Newspaper Analytics
By Paul Fyfe (Associate Professor of English, North Carolina State University) and Qian Ge (PhD Candidate in Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University)

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Nineteenth-Century Newspaper Analytics

The project represents an innovative partnership between researchers in English literature, Electrical & Computer Engineering, and data analytics in pursuit of a seemingly simple research question: How can computer vision and image processing techniques be adapted for large-scale interpretation of historical illustrations? The project is developing methods in image analytics to study a corpus of illustrated nineteenth-century British newspapers from the British Library’s collection, including The Graphic, The Illustrated Police News, and the Penny Illustrated Paper. 

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Paul Fyfe and Qian Ge gave a recorded acceptance speech at the Symposium as they were unable to attend in person.

It aims to suggest ways of adapting image processing techniques to other historical media while also pursuing scholarship on nineteenth-century visual culture and the illustrated press. The project also exposes the formidable technical challenges presented by historical illustrations and suggests ways to refine computer vision algorithms and analytics workflows for such difficult data. The website includes sample workflows as well as speculations about how large-scale image analytics might yield insights into the cultural past, plus much more: http://ncna.dh.chass.ncsu.edu/imageanalytics 

Commercial Award runner up
Isabel Oswell, Head of Business Audiences at the British Library announced that the runner up of the Commercial Award was...

Poetic Places
By Sarah Cole (TIME/IMAGE organisation and Creative Entrepreneur-in-Residence at the British Library)

Bl_labs_symposium_2016_172Sarah Cole, presenting Poetic Places PoeticPoetic Places

Poetic Places is a free app for iOS and Android devices which was launched in March 2016. It brings poetic depictions of places into the everyday world, helping users to encounter poems in the locations described by the literature, accompanied by contextualising historical narratives and relevant audiovisual materials. These materials are primarily drawn from open archive collections, including the British Library Flickr collection. Utilising geolocation services and push notifications, Poetic Places can (whilst running in the background on the device) let users know when they stumble across a place depicted in verse and art, encouraging serendipitous discovery. Alternatively, they can browse the poems and places via map and list interfaces as a source of inspiration without travelling. Poetic Places aspires to give a renewed sense of place, to bring together writings and paintings and sounds to mean more than they do alone, and to bring literature into people’s everyday life in unexpected moments.

Artistic Award runner up
Jamie Andrews, Head of Culture and Learning at the British Library announced that the runner up of the Artistic Award was... 

Bl_labs_symposium_2016_190Kristina Hofmann and Claudia Rosa Lukas

Fashion Utopia
By Kris Hofmann (Animation Director) and Claudia Rosa Lukas (Curator)

 
Fashion Utopia

The project involved the creation of an 80 second animation and five vines which accompanied the Austrian contribution to the International Fashion Showcase London, organised annually by the British Council and the British Fashion Council. Fashion Utopia garnered creative inspiration from the treasure trove of images from the British Library Flickr Commons collection and more than 500 images were used to create a moving collage that was, in a second step, juxtaposed with stop-frame animated items of fashion and accessories.

Teaching / Learning Award runner up
Ria Bartlett, Lead Producer: Onsite Learning at the British Library announced that the runner up of the Teaching / Learning Award was...

The PhD Abstracts Collections in FLAX: Academic English with the Open Access Electronic Theses Online Service (EThOS) at the British Library

By Shaoqun Wu (FLAX Research & Development and Lecturer in Computer Science), Alannah Fitzgerald (FLAX Open Education Research and PhD Candidate), Ian H. Witten (FLAX Project Lead and Professor of Computer Science) and Chris Mansfield (English Language and Academic Writing Tutor)

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The PhD Abstracts Collections in FLAX

The project presents an educational research study into the development and evaluation of domain-specific language corpora derived from PhD abstracts with the Electronic Theses Online Service (EThOS) at the British Library. The collections, which are openly available from this study, were built using the interactive FLAX (Flexible Language Acquisition flax.nzdl.org) open-source software for uptake in English for Specific Academic Purposes programmes (ESAP) at Queen Mary University of London. The project involved the harvesting of metadata, including the abstracts of 400,000 doctoral theses from UK universities, from the EThOS Toolkit at the British Library. These digital PhD abstract text collections were then automatically analysed, enriched, and transformed into a resource that second-language and novice research writers can browse and query in order to extend their ability to understand the language used in specific domains, and to help them develop their abstract writing. It is anticipated that the practical contribution of the FLAX tools and the EThOS PhD Abstract collections will benefit second-language and novice research writers in understanding the language used to achieve the persuasive and promotional aspects of the written research abstract genre. It is also anticipated that users of the collections will be able to develop their arguments more fluently and precisely through the practice of research abstract writing to project a persuasive voice as is used in specific research disciplines.

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Alannah Fitzgerald and Chris Mansfield receiving the Runner Up Teaching and Learning Award on behalf of the FLAX team.

British Library Labs Staff Award runner up
Phil Spence, Chief Operating Officer at the British Library announced that the runner up of the British Library Labs Staff Award as...

SHINE 2.0 - A Historical Search Engine

Led by Andy Jackson (Web Archiving Technical Lead at the British Library) and Gil Hoggarth (Senior Web Archiving Engineer at the British Library)

Shine
SHINE

SHINE is a state-of-the-art demonstrator for the potential of Web Archives to transform research. The current implementation of SHINE exposes metadata from the Internet Archive's UK domain web archives for the years 1996- 2013. This data was licensed for use by the British Library by agreement with JISC. SHINE represents a high level of innovation in access and analysis of web archives, allowing sophisticated searching of a very large and loosely-structured dataset and showing many of the characteristics of "Big Social Data". Users can fine-tune results to look for file-types, results from specific domains, languages used and geo-location data (post-code look-up). The interface was developed by Web Archive technical development alongside the AHRC-funded Big UK Domain Data for the Arts and Humanities project. An important concept in its design and development was that it would be researcher-led and SHINE was developed iteratively with research case studies relating to use of UK web archives.

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Andy Jackson, Receiving the Runner up Staff Award on behalf of the SHINE team

The lead institution for SHINE was the University of London, with Professor Jane Winters as principle investigator, and former British Library staff members Peter Webster and Helen Hockx were also instrumental in developing the project and maintaining researcher engagement through the project. 

10 November 2016

British Library Labs Symposium 2016 - Competition and Award Winners

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The 4th annual British Library Labs Symposium took place on 7th November 2016 and was a resounding success! 

More than 220 people attended and the event was a fantastic experience, showcasing and celebrating the Digital Scholarship field and highlighting the work of BL Labs and their collaborators. The Symposium included a number of exciting announcements about the winners of the BL Labs Competition and BL Labs Awards, who are presented in this blog post. Separate posts will be published about the runners up of the Competition and Awards and posts written by all of the winners and runners up about their work are also scheduled for the next few weeks - watch this space!

BL Labs Competition winner for 2016

Roly Keating, Chief Executive of the British Library announced that the overall winner of the BL Labs Competition for 2016 was...

SherlockNet: Using Convolutional Neural Networks to automatically tag and caption the British Library Flickr collection
By Karen Wang and Luda Zhao, Masters students at Stanford University, and Brian Do, Harvard Medicine MD student

Machine learning can extract information and insights from data on a massive scale. The project developed and optimised Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN), inspired by biological neural networks in the brain, in order to tag and caption the British Library’s Flickr Commons 1 million collection. In the first step of the project, images were classified with general categorical tags (e.g. “people”, “maps”). This served as the basis for the development of new ways to facilitate rapid online tagging with user-defined sets of tags. In the second stage, automatically generate descriptive natural-language captions were provided for images (e.g. “A man in a meadow on a horse”). This computationally guided approach has produced automatic pattern recognition which provides a more intuitive way for researchers to discover and use images. The tags and captions will be made accessible and searchable by the public through the web-based interface and text annotations will be used to globally analyse trends in the Flickr collection over time.

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SherlockNet team presenting at the Symposium

Karen Wang is currently a senior studying Computer Science at Stanford University, California. She also has an Art Practice minor. Karen is very interested in the intersection of computer science and humanities research, so this project is near and dear to her heart! She will be continuing her studies next year at Stanford in CS, Artificial Intelligence track.

Luda Zhao is currently a Masters student studying Computer Science at Stanford University, living in Palo Alto, California. He is interested in using machine learning and data mining to tackle tough problems in a variety of real-life contexts, and he's excited to work with the British Library to make art more discoverable for people everywhere.

Brian Do grew up in sunny California and is a first-year MD/PhD student at Harvard Medical School. Previously he studied Computer Science and biology at Stanford. Brian loves using data visualisation and cutting edge tools to reveal unexpected things about sports, finance and even his own text message history.

SherlockNet recently posted an update of their work and you can try out their SherlockNet interface and tell us what you think.

BL Labs Awards winners for 2016

Research Award winner

Allan Sudlow, Head of Research Development at the British Library announced that the winner of the Research Award was...

Scissors and Paste

By Melodee Beals, Lecturer in Digital History at Loughborough University and historian of migration and media

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Melodee Beals presenting Scissors & Paste

Scissors and Paste utilises the 1800-1900 digitised British Library Newspapers, collection to explore the possibilities of mining large-scale newspaper databases for reprinted and repurposed news content. The project has involved the development of a suite of tools and methodologies, created using both out-of-the-box and custom-made project-specific software, to efficiently identify reprint families of journalistic texts and then suggest both directionality and branching within these subsets. From these case-studies, detailed analyses of additions, omissions and wholesale changes offer insights into the mechanics of reprinting that left behind few if any other traces in the historical record.

Melodee Beals joined the Department of Politics, History and International Relations at Loughborough University in September 2015. Previously, Melodee has worked as a pedagogical researcher for the History Subject Centre, a teaching fellow for the School of Comparative American Studies at the University of Warwick and a Principal Lecturer for Sheffield Hallam University, where she acted as Subject Group Leader for History. Melodee completed her PhD at the University of Glasgow.

Commercial Award winner

Isabel Oswell, Head of Business Audiences at the British Library announced that the winner of the Commercial Award was...

Curating Digital Collections to Go Mobile

By Mitchel Davis, publishing and media entrepreneur

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Mitchell Davis presenting Curating Digital Collections to Go Mobile

As a direct result of its collaborative work with the British Library, BiblioLabs has developed BiblioBoard, an award-winning e-Content delivery platform, and online curatorial and multimedia publishing tools to support it. These tools make it simple for subject area experts to create visually stunning multi-media exhibits for the web and mobile devices without any technical expertise. The curatorial output is almost instantly available via a fully responsive web site as well as through native apps for mobile devices. This unified digital library interface incorporates viewers for PDF, ePub, images, documents, video and audio files allowing users to immerse themselves in the content without having to link out to other sites to view disparate media formats.

Mitchell Davis founded BookSurge in 2000, the world’s first integrated global print-on-demand and publishing services company (sold to Amazon.com in 2005 and re-branded as CreateSpace). Since 2008, he has been founder and chief business officer of BiblioLabs- the creators of BiblioBoard. Mitchell is also an indie producer and publisher who has created several award winning indie books and documentary films over the past decade through Organic Process Productions, a small philanthropic media company he founded with his wife Farrah Hoffmire in 2005.

Artistic Award winner

Jamie Andrews, Head of Culture and Learning at the British Library announced that the winner of the Artistic Award was... 

Here there, Young Sailor

Written and directed by writer and filmmaker Ling Low and visual art by Lyn Ong

Hey There, Young Sailor combines live action with animation, hand-drawn artwork and found archive images to tell a love story set at sea. Inspired by the works of early cinema pioneer Georges Méliès, the video draws on late 19th century and early 20th century images from the British Library's Flickr collection for its collages and tableaux. The video was commissioned by Malaysian indie folk band The Impatient Sisters and independently produced by a Malaysian and Indonesian team.

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Ling Low receives her Award from Jamie Andrews

Ling Low is based between Malaysia and the UK and she has written and directed various short films and music videos. In her fiction and films, Ling is drawn to the complexities of human relationships and missed connections. By day, she works as a journalist and media consultant. Ling has edited a non-fiction anthology of human interest journalism, entitled Stories From The City: Rediscovering Kuala Lumpur, published in 2016. Her journalism has also been published widely, including in the Guardian, the Telegraph and Esquire Malaysia.

Teaching / Learning Award winner

Ria Bartlett, Lead Producer: Onsite Learning at the British Library announced that the winner of the Teaching / Learning Award was...

Library Carpentry

Founded by James Baker, Lecturer at the Sussex Humanities Lab, who represented the global Library Carpentry Team (see below) at the Symposium

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James Baker presenting Library Carpentry

Library Carpentry is software skills training aimed at the needs and requirements of library professionals. It takes the form of a series of modules that are available online for self-directed study or for adaption and reuse by library professionals in face-to-face workshops. Library Carpentry is in the commons and for the commons: it is not tied to any institution or person. For more information on Library Carpentry see http://librarycarpentry.github.io/

James Baker is a Lecturer in Digital History and Archives at the School of History, Art History and Philosophy and at the Sussex Humanities Lab. He is a historian of the long eighteenth century and contemporary Britain. James is a Software Sustainability Institute Fellow and holds degrees from the University of Southampton and latterly the University of Kent. Prior to joining Sussex, James has held positions of Digital Curator at the British Library and Postdoctoral Fellow with the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies of British Art. James is a convenor of the Institute of Historical Research Digital History seminar and a member of the History Lab Plus Advisory Board.

 The Library Carpentry Team is regularly accepting new members and currently also includes: 

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The Library Carpentry Team

British Library Labs Staff Award winner

Phil Spence, Chief Operating Officer at the British Library announced that the winner of the British Library Labs Staff Award was...

Libcrowds

Led by Alex Mendes, Software Developer at the British Library

LibCrowds is a crowdsourcing platform built by Alexander Mendes. It aims to create searchable catalogue records for some of the hundreds of thousands of items that can currently only be found in printed and card catalogues. By participating in the crowdsourcing projects, users will help researchers everywhere to access the British Library’s collections more easily in the future.

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Nora McGregor presenting LibCrowds on behalf of Alex Mendes

The first project series, Convert-a-Card, experimented with a new method for transforming printed card catalogues into electronic records for inclusion in our online catalogue Explore, by asking volunteers to link scanned images of the cards with records retrieved from the WorldCat database. Additional projects have recently been launched that invite volunteers to transcribe cards that may require more specific language skills, such as the South Asian minor languages. Records matched, located, transcribed or translated as part of the crowdsourcing projects were uploaded to the British Library's Explore catalogue for anyone to search online. By participating users can have a direct impact on the availability of research material to anyone interested in the diverse collections available at the British Library.

Alex Mendes has worked at the British Library for several years and recently completed a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science with the Open University. Alex enjoys the consistent challenges encountered when attempting to find innovative new solutions to unusual problems in software development.

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Alex Mendes

If you would like to find out more about BL Labs, our Competition or Awards please contact us at labs@bl.uk