THE BRITISH LIBRARY

Medieval manuscripts blog

31 July 2015

Happy Uncommon Musical Instrument Appreciation Day!

As we are sure you are all aware, today is Uncommon Musical Instrument Appreciation Day, the day on which we are urged to take time to think about the rare and unusual instruments that have gone obsolete, or are otherwise beyond our ken.  We would like to offer a number of examples in the spirit of this momentous occasion - the familiar, the forgotten and the simply odd.  Please be sure to send any other gems you might encounter to us on Twitter @BLMedieval.  Without any further ado:

Add MS 47683 f. 1v G70059-77
Folio with musical instruments, from a leaf from a giant Bible, Italy, 11th-12th century, Add MS 47683, f. 1v

Harley MS 4951, f. 299v E123871
Detail of a man with bells among musical neumes, from the Gradual of Saint-Etienne of Toulouse, France (Toulouse), last quarter of the 11th-first quarter of the 12th century, Harley MS 4951, f. 299v

Harley MS 2804 f. 3vE102183c
Detail of two musicians playing the vielle and a harp or psaltery, from the Worms
Bible, Germany (Frankenthal), 2nd-3rd quarter of the 12th century, Harley MS 2804, f. 3v

Add MS 62925 f. 54r copy copy
Detail of a miniature of a rabbit playing a bell-like instrument, from the Rutland Psalter, England (London?), c. 1260, Add MS 62925, f. 54r

Stowe_ms_17_f061v copy
Detail of two monkeys playing trumpets in an unusual manner, from the Maastricht Hours, Liège, 1st quarter of the 14th century, Stowe MS 17, f. 61v

Add_ms_49622_f106v copy
Detail of a marginal painting of a rabbit and a dog playing a portative organ, from the Gorleston Psalter, England (Suffolk?), 1310-1324, Add MS 49622, f. 106v

Royal MS 14 E III f. 89r c13827-54c
Detail of a marginal painting of a man playing a rabbit-trumpet (despite distractions), from La Queste del Saint Graal, France, c. 1315 - c. 1325, Royal MS 14 E III, f. 89r

 Harley MS 6563 f. 40r E123884
Detail of a cat playing a vielle, from a fragmentary Book of Hours, England (London), c. 1320 - c. 1330, Harley MS 6563, f. 40r

Add_ms_18851_f419v copy
Detail of a marginal painting of a monkey playing bagpipes, from the Breviary of Queen Isabella of Castile, Bruges, c. 1497, Add MS 18851, f. 419v

Add MS 18852, f. 98r copy copy
Detail of a marginal painting of bagpipes (?), from the Hours of Joanna the Mad, Bruges, 1486-1506, Add MS 18852, f. 98r

Arundel_ms_263_f136r and f. 137v
Leonardo da Vinci's drawings, including a mechanical organ and timpani/drums, from the Codex Arundel, Italy (Florence, Milan, and Rome), 1478-1518, Arundel MS 263, f. 136r and 137v

- Sarah J Biggs

Comments

I don't think that's a hurdy-gurdy - more like a portative organ?

Entertaining images, but some dubious identification. Both the rebecs are vielles. The "hurdy-gurdy" is a portative organ. Hurdy-gurdies are string instruments and have no pipes. The "cithar" (is that the name in the original text?) is either a harp or a psaltery, depending whether you think the painter is trying to depict a soundbox behind the strings.

Thanks for a wonderful post! I believe the dog and rabbit in the the image from the Gorleston Psalter are playing a portative organ, not a hurdy-gurdy. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portative_organ -- Brian Sidlauskas

Hello and thank you for this wonderful inspiring page from Germany! I agree the "rebec" has too many strings to be a rebec. Agree as well with the Hurdy-Gurdy being a portable organ.
Tip for readers: Head for the rest of images in the Hours from London (the image with the "rebec") - there is an amusing collection of animals doing all sorts of things, especially cats and mice.

4 August
Thank you everyone for your comments, and for the correct identifications of some of the musical instruments featured here. We have incorporated your emendations in the text above. The Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts Team.

Something for the instrumentals players to be happy about.

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