THE BRITISH LIBRARY

UK Web Archive blog

3 posts categorized "Social media"

22 September 2016

Web Archiving Rio 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games

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‘For the Olympics, the whole world is captivated, turns on its television and supports their country’

Introduction
The Olympic and Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil may be over but it will be some time before they are forgotten about in the press and social media. Web archives play a vital role in preserving the narratives that have come out of these Games. The Content Development Group (CDG) at the International Internet Preservation Consortium (IIPC) has been archiving both the Winter and Summer Games since 2010 and the Rio 2016 Collection will be available in October 2016.

Rio-world-map

Rio 2016 is the first time the CDG has archived events both on and off the playing field making this its biggest collection so far in terms of the number of nominations and geographical coverage. The CDG also enlisted the help of subject experts as well as the general public to nominate sites from countries not usually covered in IIPC collections. As the IIPC only has members in around 33 countries public nominations played an important role in filling this void.

What’s involved?
But what’s involved in web archiving the Olympics? CDG members the British Library and the National Library of Scotland co-hosted a Twitter chat on 10th August 2016 to give an insight on what’s involved. The Twitter chat was based on set questions published in an IIPC blog post with a Q&A session and some time for live nominations. This was an international chat with participants from the USA, Ireland, England, Scotland, Serbia and even Australia. The chat was added to Storify as well as the final archived collection of the Games. Even though the chat was small it helped us to connect with a wider audience and increase the number of public nominations. You can follow updates on this project on Twitter by using the collection hashtag #Rio2016WA.

How can you get involved?
There is still time for you to get involved in web archiving the Olympics and Paralympics. The public nomination form will be open till 23rd September 2016. If you would like to make a nomination you can follow these guidelines. As Carly Lloyd stated above the whole world is captivated by the Olympics now is your opportunity to be part of it.

By Helena Byrne, Assistant Web Archivist, The British Library

17 May 2016

Saving BBC Recipes Website

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There's been much coverage today of plans to remove the recipe pages from the BBC website.

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The UK Web Archive has been collecting selected pages from the BBC, mainly news, for over ten years and since 2013 we have attempted to capture the entirety of the BBC web estate. A small number of pages are available on the Open UK Web Archive website. Most of the BBC's online presence, however, is only available in the reading rooms of UK Legal Deposit libraries, including both of the British Library sites at St. Pancras and Boston Spa in Yorkshire.

We have today instigated a further crawl of the BBC website with the specific aim of ensuring that we save the recipes from the food pages. We can also report that the Internet Archive, Library of Alexandria and the National Library of Iceland have also captured these pages so their future is assured.

Polly Russell, British Library Curator and Food Historian says 

"Cookery books, like cookery websites, obviously serve a practical purpose but that is not all. For historians, sociologists and anthropologists they also tell us about people's culinary aspirations and anxieties, cultural tastes and trends, dietary preoccupations, social expectations and economic conditions. They are, therefore, a rich source for researchers. So while it's sad news to hear about plans to close the much trusted and well-loved BBC Food website, it's a relief that the British Library is going to be able to archive the website for posterity."

 

 

02 December 2011

Twittervane: Crowdsourcing selection

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TwitterbirdWe’re excited to announce development of a new tool to automate the selection of websites for archiving: the Twittervane.

At the moment, our selection process is manual, dependent upon internal subject specialists or external experts to contact us and nominate websites for archiving in the UK Web Archive. We benefit from their expertise and wouldn’t be without it, but we recognise that this manual selection process can sometimes be time consuming for frequent selectors. It’s also inevitably subjective, reflecting the interests of a relatively small number of selectors. 

Automated selection is an efficient and under-utilised alternative, but up until now it has been difficult to see how an automated approach could clearly identify the most popular and widely relevant websites. Our answer?  Twittervane. 

The Twittervane project will investigate how the power and wisdom of the crowd can be leveraged to automatically select websites for archiving. In essence, it's a crowdsourcing approach to selection that will compliment the manual selections provided by subject specialists and other experts. 

The project will:

  • Deliver a prototype tool for analysing twitter content that will:
    • determine which websites are shared most frequently around a given theme over a given time period;
    • link to our existing web archiving infrastructure to support harvesting of sites that fall within the UK domain
  • Generate at least one pilot special collection comprising websites most frequently shared across the crowd that address or are relevant to a unifying theme
  • Assess the viability of the approach from a curatorial perspective and investigate the ‘wisdom of crowds’ in this context. 

It’s important to get curatorial input to this approach, so we’ll be asking curators from the Library to assess the quality and relevance of resulting selections. The project will start in December and the prototype completed in time for next year’s IIPC May General Assembly in Washington, particularly important as the IIPC are contributing funding for the project.

We aim to provide regular progress updates as development takes place, so watch this space - and Twitter, of course - for more details.