THE BRITISH LIBRARY

Digital scholarship blog

50 posts categorized "Contemporary Britain"

21 May 2020

The British Library Simulator

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The British Library Simulator is a mini game built using the Bitsy game engine, where you can wander around a pixelated (and much smaller) version of the British Library building in St Pancras. Bitsy is known for its compact format and limited colour-palette - you can often recognise your avatar and the items you can interact with by the fact they use a different colour from the background.

The British Library building depicted in Bitsy
The British Library Simulator Bitsy game

Use the arrow keys on your keyboard (or the WASD buttons) to move around the rooms and interact with other characters and objects you meet on the way - you might discover something new about the building and the digital projects the Library is working on!

Bitsy works best in the Chrome browser and if you’re playing on your smartphone, use a sliding movement to move your avatar and tap on the text box to progress with the dialogues.

Most importantly: have fun!

The British Library, together with the other five UK Legal Deposit Libraries, has been collecting examples of complex digital publications, including works made with Bitsy, as part of the Emerging Formats Project. This collection area is continuously expanding, as we include new examples of digital media and interactive storytelling. The formats and tools used to create these publications are varied, and allow for innovative and often immersive solutions that could only be delivered via a digital medium. You can read more about freely-available tools to write interactive fiction here.

This post is by Giulia Carla Rossi, Curator of Digital Publications (@giugimonogatari).

20 May 2020

Bringing Metadata & Full-text Together

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This is a guest post by enthusiastic data and metadata nerd Andy Jackson (@anjacks0n), Technical Lead for the UK Web Archive.

In Searching eTheses for the openVirus project we put together a basic system for searching theses. This only used the information from the PDFs themselves, which meant the results looked like this:

openVirus EThOS search results screen
openVirus EThOS search results screen

The basics are working fine, but the document titles are largely meaningless, the last-modified dates are clearly suspect (26 theses in the year 1600?!), and the facets aren’t terribly useful.

The EThOS metadata has much richer information that the EThOS team has collected and verified over the years. This includes:

  • Title
  • Author
  • DOI, ISNI, ORCID
  • Institution
  • Date
  • Supervisor(s)
  • Funder(s)
  • Dewey Decimal Classification
  • EThOS Service URL
  • Repository (‘Landing Page’) URL

So, the question is, how do we integrate these two sets of data into a single system?

Linking on URLs

The EThOS team supplied the PDF download URLs for each record, but we need a common identifer to merge these two datasets. Fortunately, both datasets contain the EThOS Service URL, which looks like this:

https://ethos.bl.uk/OrderDetails.do?uin=uk.bl.ethos.755301

This (or just the uk.bl.ethos.755301 part) can be used as the ‘key’ for the merge, leaving us with one data set that contains the download URLs alongside all the other fields. We can then process the text from each PDF, and look up the URL in this metadata dataset, and merge the two together in the same way.

Except… it doesn’t work.

The web is a messy place: those PDF URLs may have been direct downloads in the past, but now many of them are no longer simple links, but chains of redirects. As an example, this original download URL:

http://repository.royalholloway.ac.uk/items/bf7a78df-c538-4bff-a28d-983a91cf0634/1/10090181.pdf

Now redirects (HTTP 301 Moved Permanently) to the HTTPS version:

https://repository.royalholloway.ac.uk/items/bf7a78df-c538-4bff-a28d-983a91cf0634/1/10090181.pdf

Which then redirects (HTTP 302 Found) to the actual PDF file:

https://repository.royalholloway.ac.uk/file/bf7a78df-c538-4bff-a28d-983a91cf0634/1/10090181.pdf

So, to bring this all together, we have to trace these links between the EThOS records and the actual PDF documents.

Re-tracing Our Steps

While the crawler we built to download these PDFs worked well enough, it isn’t quite a sophisticated as our main crawler, which is based on Heritrix 3. In particular, Heritrix offers details crawl logs that can be used to trace crawler activity. This functionality would be fairly easy to add to Scrapy, but that’s not been done yet. So, another approach is needed.

To trace the crawl, we need to be able to look up URLs and then analyse what happened. In particular, for every starting URL (a.k.a. seed) we want to check if it was a redirect and if so, follow that URL to see where it leads.

We already use content (CDX) indexes to allow us to look up URLs when accessing content. In particular, we use OutbackCDX as the index, and then the pywb playback system to retrieve and access the records and see what happened. So one option is to spin up a separate playback system and query that to work out where the links go.

However, as we only want to trace redirects, we can do something a little simpler. We can use the OutbackCDX service to look up what we got for each URL, and use the same warcio library that pywb uses to read the WARC record and find any redirects. The same process can then be repeated with the resulting URL, until all the chains of redirects have been followed.

This leaves us with a large list, linking every URL we crawled back to the original PDF URL. This can then be used to link each item to the corresponding EThOS record.

This large look-up table allowed the full-text and metadata to be combined. It was then imported into a new Solr index that replaced the original service, augmenting the records with the new metadata.

Updating the Interface

The new fields are accessible via the same API as before – see this simple search as an example.

The next step was to update the UI to take advantage of these fields. This was relatively simple, as it mostly involved exchanging one field name for another (e.g. from last_modified_year to year_i), and adding a few links to take advantage of the fact we now have access to the URLs to the EThOS records and the landing pages.

The result can be seen at:

EThOS Faceted Search Prototype

The Results

This new service provides a much better interface to the collection, and really demonstrates the benefits of combining machine-generated and manually curated metadata.

New openVirus EThOS search results interface
New improved openVirus EThOS search results interface

There are still some issues with the source data that need to be resolved at some point. In particular, there are now only 88,082 records, which indicates that some gaps and mismatches emerged during the process of merging these records together.

But it’s good enough for now.

The next question is: how do we integrate this into the openVirus workflow? 

 

14 May 2020

Searching eTheses for the openVirus project

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This is a guest post by Andy Jackson (@anjacks0n), Technical Lead for the UK Web Archive and enthusiastic data-miner.

Introduction

The COVID-19 outbreak is an unprecedented global crisis that has prompted an unprecedented global response. I’ve been particularly interested in how academic scholars and publishers have responded:

It’s impressive how much has been done in such a short time! But I also saw one comment that really stuck with me:

“Our digital libraries and archives may hold crucial clues and content about how to help with the #covid19 outbreak: particularly this is the case with scientific literature. Now is the time for institutional bravery around access!”
– @melissaterras

Clearly, academic scholars and publishers are already collaborating. What could digital libraries and archives do to help?

Scale, Audience & Scope

Almost all the efforts I’ve seen so far are focused on helping scientists working on the COVID-19 response to find information from publications that are directly related to coronavirus epidemics. The outbreak is much bigger than this. In terms of scope, it’s not just about understanding the coronavirus itself. The outbreak raises many broader questions, like:

  • What types of personal protective equipment are appropriate for different medical procedures?
  • How effective are the different kinds of masks when it comes to protecting others?
  • What coping strategies have proven useful for people in isolation?

(These are just the examples I’ve personally seen requests for. There will be more.)

Similarly, the audience is much wider than the scientists working directly on the COVID-19 response. From medical professions wanting to know more about protective equipment, to journalists looking for context and counter-arguments.

As a technologist working at the British Library, I felt like there must be some way I could help this situation. Some way to help a wider audience dig out any potentially relevant material we might hold?

The openVirus Project

While looking out for inspiration, I found Peter Murray-Rust’s openVirus project. Peter is a vocal supporter of open source and open data, and had launched an ambitious attempt to aggregate information relating to viruses and epidemics from scholarly publications.

In contrast to the other efforts I’d seen, Peter wanted to focus on novel data-mining methods, and on pulling in less well-known sources of information. This dual focus on text analysis and on opening up underutilised resources appealed to me. And I already had a particular resource in mind…

EThOS

Of course, the British Library has a very wide range of holdings, but as an ex-academic scientist I’ve always had a soft spot for EThOS, which provides electronic access to UK theses.

Through the web interface, users can search the metadata and abstracts of over half a million theses. Furthermore, to support data mining and analysis, the EThOS metadata has been published as a dataset. This dataset includes links to institutional repository pages for many of the theses.

Although doctoral theses are not generally considered to be as important as journal articles, they are a rich and underused source of information, capable of carrying much more context and commentary than a brief article[1].

The Idea

Having identified EThOS as source of information, the idea was to see if I could use our existing UK Web Archive tools to collect and index the full-text of these theses, build a simple faceted search interface, and perform some basic data-mining operations. If that worked, it would allow relevant theses to be discovered and passed to the openVirus tools for more sophisticated analysis.

Preparing the data sources

The links in the EThOS dataset point to the HTML landing-page for each theses, rather than to the full text itself. To get to the text, the best approach would be to write a crawler to find the PDFs. However, it would take a while to create something that could cope with the variety of ways the landing pages tend to be formatted. For machines, it’s not always easy to find the link to the actual theses!

However, many of the universities involved have given the EThOS team permission to download a copy of their theses for safe-keeping. The URLs of the full-text files are only used once (to collect each thesis shortly after publication), but have nevertheless been kept in the EThOS system since then. These URLs are considered transient (i.e. likely to ‘rot’ over time) and come with no guarantees of longer-term availability (unlike the landing pages), so are not included in the main EThOS dataset. Nevertheless, the EThOS team were able to give me the list of PDF URLs, making it easier to get started quickly.

This is far from ideal: we will miss theses that have been moved to new URLs, and from universities that do not take part (which, notably, includes Oxford and Cambridge). This skew would be avoided if we were to use the landing-page URLs provided for all UK digital theses to crawl the PDFs. But we need to move quickly.

So, while keeping these caveats in mind, the first task was to crawl the URLs and see if the PDFs were still there…

Collecting the PDFs

A simple Scrapy crawler was created, one that could read the PDF URLs and download them without overloading the host repositories. The crawler itself does nothing with them, but by running behind warcprox the web requests and responses (including the PDFs) can be captured in the standardised Web ARChive (WARC) format.

For 35 hours, the crawler attempted to download the 130,330 PDF URLs. Quite a lot of URLs had already changed, but 111,793 documents were successfully downloaded. Of these, 104,746 were PDFs.

All the requests and responses generated by the crawler were captured in 1,433 WARCs each around 1GB in size, totalling around 1.5TB of data.

Processing the WARCs

We already have tools for handling WARCs, so the task was to re-use them and see what we get. As this collection is mostly PDFs, Apache Tika and PDFBox are doing most of the work, but the webarchive-discovery wrapper helps run them at scale and add in additional metadata.

The WARCs were transferred to our internal Hadoop cluster, and in just over an hour the text and associated metadata were available as about 5GB of compressed JSON Lines.

A Legal Aside

Before proceeding, there’s legal problem that we need to address. Despite being freely-available over the open web, the rights and licenses under which these documents are being made available can be extremely varied and complex.

There’s no problem gathering the content and using it for data mining. The problem is that there are limitations on what we can redistribute without permission: we can’t redistribute the original PDFs, or any close approximation.

However, collections of facts about the PDFs are fine.

But for the other openVirus tools to do their work, we need to be able to find out what each thesis are about. So how can we make this work?

One answer is to generate statistical summaries of the contents of the documents. For example, we can break the text of each document up into individual words, and count how often each word occurs. These word frequencies are a no substitute for the real text, but are redistributable and suitable for answering simple queries.

These simple queries can be used to narrow down the overall dataset, picking out a relevant subset. Once the list of documents of interest is down to a manageable size, an individual researcher can download the original documents themselves, from the original hosts[2]. As the researcher now has local copies, they can run their own tools over them, including the openVirus tools.

Word Frequencies

second, simpler Hadoop job was created, post-processing the raw text and replacing it with the word frequency data. This produced 6GB of uncompressed JSON Lines data, which could then be loaded into an instance of the Apache Solr search tool [3].

While Solr provides a user interface, it’s not really suitable for general users, nor is it entirely safe to expose to the World Wide Web. To mitigate this, the index was built on a virtual server well away from any production systems, and wrapped with a web server configured in a way that should prevent problems.

The API this provides (see the Solr documentation for details) enables us to find which theses include which terms. Here are some example queries:

This is fine for programmatic access, but with a little extra wrapping we can make it more useful to more people.

APIs & Notebooks

For example, I was able to create live API documentation and a simple user interface using Google’s Colaboratory:

Using the openVirus EThOS API

Google Colaboratory is a proprietary platform, but those notebooks can be exported as more standard Jupyter Notebooks. See here for an example.

Faceted Search

Having carefully exposed the API to the open web, I was also able to take an existing browser-based faceted search interface and modify to suite our use case:

EThOS Faceted Search Prototype

Best of all, this is running on the Glitch collaborative coding platform, so you can go look at the source code and remix it yourself, if you like:

EThOS Faceted Search Prototype – Glitch project

Limitations

The main limitation of using word-frequencies instead of full-text is that phrase search is broken. Searching for face AND mask will work as expected, but searching for “face mask” doesn’t.

Another problem is that the EThOS metadata has not been integrated with the raw text search. This would give us a much richer experience, like accurate publication years and more helpful facets[4].

In terms of user interface, the faceted search UI above is very basic, but for the openVirus project the API is likely to be of more use in the short term.

Next Steps

To make the search more usable, the next logical step is to attempt to integrate the full-text search with the EThOS metadata.

Then, if the results look good, we can start to work out how to feed the results into the workflow of the openVirus tool suite.

 


1. Even things like negative results, which are informative but can be difficult to publish in article form. ↩︎

2. This is similar data sharing pattern used by Twitter researchers. See, for example, the DocNow Catalogue. ↩︎

3. We use Apache Solr a lot so this was the simplest choice for us. ↩︎

4. Note that since writing this post, this limitation has been rectified. ↩︎

 

14 April 2020

BL Labs Artistic Award Winner 2019 - The Memory Archivist - Lynda Clark

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Posted on behalf of Lynda Clark, BL Labs Artistic Award Winner 2019 by Mahendra Mahey, Manager of BL Labs.

My research, writing and broader critical practice are inextricably linked. For example, the short story “Ghillie’s Mum”, recently nominated for the BBC Short Story Award, was an exploration of fraught parent / child relationships, which fed into my interactive novella Writers Are Not Strangers, which was in turn the culmination of research into the way readers and players respond to writers and creators both directly and indirectly. 

The Memory Archivist” BL Labs Artistic award winner 2019, offers a similar blending of creative work, research and reflection. The basis for the project was the creation of a collection of works of interactive fiction for the UK Web Archive (UKWA) as part of an investigation into whether it was possible to capture interactive works with existing web archiving tools. The project used WebRecorder and Web ACT to add almost 200 items to the UKWA. An analysis of these items was then undertaken, which indicated various recurring themes, tools and techniques used across the works. These were then incorporated into “The Memory Archivist” in various ways.

Memory Archvist
Opening screen for the Memory Archivist

The interactive fiction tool Twine was the most widely used by UK creators across the creative works, and was therefore used to create “The Memory Archivist”. Key themes such as pets, public transport and ghosts were used as the basis for the memories the player character may record. Elements of the experience of, and challenges relating to, capturing interactive works (and archival objects more generally) were also incorporated into the narrative and interactivity. When the player-character attempts to replay some of the memories they have recorded, they will find them captured only partially, or with changes to their appearance.

There were other, more direct, ways in which the Library’s digital content was included too, in the form of  repurposing code. ‘Link select’ functionality was adapted from Jonathan Laury’s Ostrich and CSS style sheets from Brevity Quest by Chris Longhurst were edited to give certain sections their distinctive look. An image from the Library’s Flickr collection was used as the central motif for the piece not only because it comes from an online digital archive, but because it is itself a motif from an archive – a French 19th Century genealogical record. Sepia tones were used for the colour palette to reflect the nostalgic nature of the piece.

Example-screen-memory-archvist
Example screen shots from the Memory Archivist

Together, these elements aim to emphasise the fact that archives are a way to connect memories, people and experiences across time and space and in spite of technological challenges, while also acknowledging that they can only ever be partial and decontextualised. 

The research into web archiving was presented at the International Internet Preservation Consortium in Zagreb and the Digital Preservation Coalition’s Web Archiving & Preservation Working Group event in Edinburgh

Other blog posts from Lynda's related work are available here:

06 April 2020

Poetry Mobile Apps

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This is a guest post by Pete Hebden, a PhD student at Newcastle University, currently undertaking a practice-led PhD; researching and creating a poetry app. Pete has recently completed a three month placement in Contemporary British Published Collections at the British Library, where he assisted curators working with the UK Web Archive, artists books and emerging formats collections, you can follow him on Twitter as @Pete_Hebden

As part of my PhD research, I have been investigating how writers and publishers have used smartphone and tablet devices to present poetry in new ways through mobile apps. In particular, I’m interested in how these new ways of presenting poetry compare to the more familiar format of the printed book. The mobile device allows poets and publishers to create new experiences for readers, incorporating location-based features, interactivity, and multimedia into the encounter with the poem.

Since the introduction of smartphones and tablet computers in the early 2010s, a huge range of digital books, e-literature, and literary games have been developed to explore the possibilities of this technology for literature. Projects like Ambient Literature and the work of Editions at Play have explored how mobile technology can transform story-telling and narrative, and similarly my project looks at how this technology can create new experiences of poetic texts.

Below are a few examples of poetry apps released over the past decade. For accessibility reasons, this selection has been limited to apps that can be used anywhere and are free to download. Some of them present work written with the mobile device in mind, while others take existing print work and re-mediate it for the mobile touchscreen.

Puzzling Poetry (iOS and Android, 2016)

Dutch developers Studio Louter worked with multiple poets to create this gamified approach to reading poetry. Existing poems are turned into puzzles to be unlocked by the reader word-by-word as they use patterns and themes within each text to figure out where each word should go. The result is that often new meanings and possibilities are noticed that might have been missed in a traditional linear reading experience.

Screen capture of Puzzling Poetry
Screen capture image of  the Puzzling Poetry app

This video explains and demonstrates how the Puzzling Poetry app works:

 

Translatory (iOS, 2016)

This app, created by Arc Publications, guides readers in creating their own English translations of contemporary foreign-language poems. Using the digital display to see multiple possible translations of each phrase, the reader gains a fresh understanding of the complex work that goes into literary translation, as well as the rich layers of meaning included within the poem. Readers are able to save their finished translations and share them through social media using the app.

Screen capture image of Translatory
Screen capture image of the Translatory app

 

Poetry: The Poetry Foundation app (iOS and Android, 2011)

At nearly a decade old, the Poetry Foundation’s Poetry app was one of the first mobile apps dedicated to poetry, and has been steadily updated by the editors of Poetry magazine ever since. It contains a huge array of both public-domain work and poems published in the magazine over the past century. To help users find their way through this, Poetry’s developers created an entertaining and useful interface for finding poems with unique combinations of themes through a roulette-wheel-style ‘spinner’. The app also responds to users shaking their phone for a random selection of poem. 

Screen capture image of The Poetry Foundation app
Screen capture image of The Poetry Foundation app

 

ABRA: A Living Text  (iOS, 2014)

A collaboration between the poets Amaranth Borsuk and Kate Durbin, and developer Ian Hatcher, the ABRA app presents readers with a range of digital tools to use (or spells to cast) on the text, which transform the text and create a unique experience for each reader. A fun and unusual way to encounter a collection of poems, giving the reader the opportunity to contribute to an ever-shifting, crowd-edited digital poem.

Screen capture image of the ABRA app
Screen capture image of the ABRA app

This artistic video below demonstrates how the ABRA app works. Painting your finger and thumb gold is not required! 

I hope you feel inspired to check out these poetry apps, or maybe even to create your own.

03 February 2020

2019 Winners of the New Media Writing Prize

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On Wednesday 15 January 2020 it was the 10th Anniversary Awards Evening of the New Media Writing Prize (NMWP) at Bournemouth University. This international prize encourages and promotes the best in new media writing; showcasing innovative digital fiction, poetry and journalism. The types of interactive writing that we have been examining and researching in the emerging formats work at the Library.

NMWP logo
New Media Writing Prize logo

Before the NMWP winners were announced there was a fun hands-on session in the afternoon, for guests to experience Digital Fiction Curios. This is an immersive experience; re-imagining selected Flash-based digital fiction by the One to One Development Trust in Virtual Reality, made in collaboration with Sheffield Hallam University. Here in the Library we are interested in their playful and innovative approach to preserving the experiences of reading their digital works, and last October the project team were invited to showcase this work to British Library staff for them to try in VR.

Dreaming Methods: Digital Fiction Curios Teaser from One to One Development Trust 

On to the main NMWP awards event, like in previous years, the 2019 competition had attracted strong entries from many parts of the world. With submissions from six continents, the event’s host Jim Pope pointed out that Antarctica was the only geographic area not to have participated yet.

Congratulations to all the 2019 winners:

  • The if:book UK New Media Writing Prize, the main category, was won by Maria Ivanova and her team of volunteers: Anna Gorovaya, Alexey Logvinov, Mike Stonelake, Anton Zayceve and Ekaterina Polyakova, from Belarus for ‘The Life of Grand Duchess Elizabeth’. A stunning biographical narrative, featuring open source archive photographs and quotations from the memoirs of generous philanthropist Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna of Russia. A granddaughter of English Queen Victoria, who lived during several key events in the history of Russia: including the Russo-Japanese War, the First World War, the revolutions of 1905 and 1917.She became one of the brightest philanthropists of Russia.
  • The Future Journalism award was won by Mahmoud El Wakea’s ‘Made in Prison’, an investigation of Jihadi radicalisation in Egypt.
  • The Unicorn Training Student award was won by Kenneth Sanchez for ‘Escaping the Chaos’. An emotive portrayal of Venezuelan migrants in Peru, with video footage of individuals telling their personal stories.
  • The Dot award for 2019 went to Clare Pollard, editor of Modern Poetry in Translation, the award will enable them to digitise their magazine and to grow their magazine internationally.
The Life of Grand Duchess Elizabeth
Still image from 'The Life of Grand Duchess Elizabeth', Winner of the 2019 if:book UK New Media Writing Prize.

It was gratifying to see that Lynda Clark featured on the main prize shortlist for her work ‘The Memory Archivist’, which was made during her Innovation Placement at the British Library in 2019. Also previous Eccles Centre Fellow, J.R. Carpenter, for the hydro-graphic novel ‘The Pleasure of the Coast’, created in partnership with the Archives Nationales in Paris.

Full shortlists were: 

The 2019 if:book main prize shortlist:

 The Unicorn Student Award 2019 shortlist:

Escaping the Chaos
Still image from 'Escaping the Chaos', Winner of the 2019 Unicorn Training Student award

The Future Journalism Award 2019 shortlist for the best digital interactive journalism, awarded by Future PLC:

Made in Prison
Still image from 'Made in Prison', Winner of the 2019 Future Journalism award 

If reading this blog post is inspiring you to consider entering the Prize in 2020, please do keep your eyes peeled for their call for submissions later in the year. You can follow NMWP on twitter and Facebook. Also do check out the Competition Rules and the FAQs to make sure your creative output fits the competition's criteria. 

This post is by Digital Curator Stella Wisdom (@miss_wisdom

03 October 2019

BL Labs Symposium (2019): Book your place for Mon 11-Nov-2019

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Posted by Mahendra Mahey, Manager of BL Labs

The BL Labs team are pleased to announce that the seventh annual British Library Labs Symposium will be held on Monday 11 November 2019, from 9:30 - 17:00* (see note below) in the British Library Knowledge Centre, St Pancras. The event is FREE, and you must book a ticket in advance to reserve your place. Last year's event was the largest we have ever held, so please don't miss out and book early!

*Please note, that directly after the Symposium, we have teamed up with an interactive/immersive theatre company called 'Uninvited Guests' for a specially organised early evening event for Symposium attendees (the full cost is £13 with some concessions available). Read more at the bottom of this posting!

The Symposium showcases innovative and inspiring projects which have used the British Library’s digital content. Last year's Award winner's drew attention to artistic, research, teaching & learning, and commercial activities that used our digital collections.

The annual event provides a platform for the development of ideas and projects, facilitating collaboration, networking and debate in the Digital Scholarship field as well as being a focus on the creative reuse of the British Library's and other organisations' digital collections and data in many other sectors. Read what groups of Master's Library and Information Science students from City University London (#CityLIS) said about the Symposium last year.

We are very proud to announce that this year's keynote will be delivered by scientist Armand Leroi, Professor of Evolutionary Biology at Imperial College, London.

Armand Leroi
Professor Armand Leroi from Imperial College
will be giving the keynote at this year's BL Labs Symposium (2019)

Professor Armand Leroi is an author, broadcaster and evolutionary biologist.

He has written and presented several documentary series on Channel 4 and BBC Four. His latest documentary was The Secret Science of Pop for BBC Four (2017) presenting the results of the analysis of over 17,000 western pop music from 1960 to 2010 from the US Bill Board top 100 charts together with colleagues from Queen Mary University, with further work published by through the Royal Society. Armand has a special interest in how we can apply techniques from evolutionary biology to ask important questions about culture, humanities and what is unique about us as humans.

Previously, Armand presented Human Mutants, a three-part documentary series about human deformity for Channel 4 and as an award winning book, Mutants: On Genetic Variety and Human Body. He also wrote and presented a two part series What Makes Us Human also for Channel 4. On BBC Four Armand presented the documentaries What Darwin Didn't Know and Aristotle's Lagoon also releasing the book, The Lagoon: How Aristotle Invented Science looking at Aristotle's impact on Science as we know it today.

Armands' keynote will reflect on his interest and experience in applying techniques he has used over many years from evolutionary biology such as bioinformatics, data-mining and machine learning to ask meaningful 'big' questions about culture, humanities and what makes us human.

The title of his talk will be 'The New Science of Culture'. Armand will follow in the footsteps of previous prestigious BL Labs keynote speakers: Dan Pett (2018); Josie Fraser (2017); Melissa Terras (2016); David De Roure and George Oates (2015); Tim Hitchcock (2014); Bill Thompson and Andrew Prescott in 2013.

The symposium will be introduced by the British Library's new Chief Librarian Liz Jolly. The day will include an update and exciting news from Mahendra Mahey (BL Labs Manager at the British Library) about the work of BL Labs highlighting innovative collaborations BL Labs has been working on including how it is working with Labs around the world to share experiences and knowledge, lessons learned . There will be news from the Digital Scholarship team about the exciting projects they have been working on such as Living with Machines and other initiatives together with a special insight from the British Library’s Digital Preservation team into how they attempt to preserve our digital collections and data for future generations.

Throughout the day, there will be several announcements and presentations showcasing work from nominated projects for the BL Labs Awards 2019, which were recognised last year for work that used the British Library’s digital content in Artistic, Research, Educational and commercial activities.

There will also be a chance to find out who has been nominated and recognised for the British Library Staff Award 2019 which highlights the work of an outstanding individual (or team) at the British Library who has worked creatively and originally with the British Library's digital collections and data (nominations close midday 5 November 2019).

As is our tradition, the Symposium will have plenty of opportunities for networking throughout the day, culminating in a reception for delegates and British Library staff to mingle and chat over a drink and nibbles.

Finally, we have teamed up with the interactive/immersive theatre company 'Uninvited Guests' who will give a specially organised performance for BL Labs Symposium attendees, directly after the symposium. This participatory performance will take the audience on a journey through a world that is on the cusp of a technological disaster. Our period of history could vanish forever from human memory because digital information will be wiped out for good. How can we leave a trace of our existence to those born later? Don't miss out on a chance to book on this unique event at 5pm specially organised to coincide with the end of the BL Labs Symposium. For more information, and for booking (spaces are limited), please visit here (the full cost is £13 with some concessions available). Please note, if you are unfortunate in not being able to join the 5pm show, there will be another performance at 1945 the same evening (book here for that one).

So don't forget to book your place for the Symposium today as we predict it will be another full house again and we don't want you to miss out.

We look forward to seeing new faces and meeting old friends again!

For any further information, please contact labs@bl.uk

02 October 2019

The 2019 British Library Labs Staff Award - Nominations Open!

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Looking for entries now!

A set of 4 light bulbs presented next to each other, the third light bulb is switched on. The image is supposed to a metaphor to represent an 'idea'
Nominate a British Library staff member or a team that has done something exciting, innovative and cool with the British Library’s digital collections or data.

The 2019 British Library Labs Staff Award, now in its fourth year, gives recognition to current British Library staff who have created something brilliant using the Library’s digital collections or data.

Perhaps you know of a project that developed new forms of knowledge, or an activity that delivered commercial value to the library. Did the person or team create an artistic work that inspired, stimulated, amazed and provoked? Do you know of a project developed by the Library where quality learning experiences were generated using the Library’s digital content? 

You may nominate a current member of British Library staff, a team, or yourself (if you are a member of staff), for the Staff Award using this form.

The deadline for submission is 12:00 (BST), Tuesday 5 November 2019.

Nominees will be highlighted on Monday 11 November 2019 at the British Library Labs Annual Symposium where some (winners and runners-up) will also be asked to talk about their projects.

You can see the projects submitted by members of staff for the last two years' awards in our online archive, as well as blogs for last year's winners and runners-up.

The Staff Award complements the British Library Labs Awards, introduced in 2015, which recognise outstanding work that has been done in the broader community. Last year's winner focused on the brilliant work of the 'Polonsky Foundation England and France Project: Digitising and Presenting Manuscripts from the British Library and the Bibliothèque nationale de France, 700–1200'.

The runner up for the BL Labs Staff Award last year was the 'Digital Documents Harvesting and Processing Tool (DDHAPT)' which was designed to overcome the problem of finding individual known documents in the United Kingdom's Legal Deposit Web Archive.

In the public competition, last year's winners drew attention to artistic, research, teaching & learning, and commercial activities that used our digital collections.

British Library Labs is a project within the Digital Scholarship department at the British Library that supports and inspires the use of the Library's digital collections and data in exciting and innovative ways. It was previously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and is now solely funded by the British Library.

If you have any questions, please contact us at labs@bl.uk.