THE BRITISH LIBRARY

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161 posts categorized "Events"

23 September 2020

Mapping Space, Mapping Time, Mapping Texts

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For many people, our personal understanding of time has been challenged during the covid-19 pandemic, with minutes, hours and days of the week seeming to all merge together into "blursday", without our previous pre covid-19 routines to help us mark points in time.

Talking of time, the AHRC-funded Chronotopic Cartographies research project has spent the last few years investigating how we might use digital tools to analyse, map, and visualise the spaces, places and time within literary texts. It draws on the literary theorist Mikhail Bakhtin's concept of the 'chronotope': a way of describing how time and place are linked and represented in different literary genres.

To showcase research from this project, next Tuesday (29th September 2020) we are co-hosting with them an online interdisciplinary conference: "Mapping Space, Mapping Time, Mapping Texts". 

Many blue dots connected with purple lines, behind text saying Mapping Space, Mapping Time, Mapping Texts

The "Mapping Space, Mapping Time, Mapping Texts" registration page is here. Once you have signed up, you will receive an email with links to recorded keynotes and webinar sessions. You will also received an email with links to the Flickr wall of virtual research posters and hangout spaces, on the morning of the conference.

The conference will go live from 09.00 BST, all webinars and live Q&A sessions will be held in Microsoft Teams. If you don't have Teams installed, you can do so before the event here. We appreciate that many participants will be joining from different time zones and that attendees may want to dip in and out of sessions; so please join at whatever pace suits you.

Our keynote speakers: James Kneale, Anders Engberg-Pederson and Robert T. Tally Jr have provided recordings of their presentations and will be joining the event for live Q&A sessions over the course of the day. You can watch the keynote recordings at any time, but if you want to have the conference experience, then log in to the webinars at the times below so you can participate "live" across the day. Q&A sessions will be held after each keynote at the times below. 

Schedule:

9.00 BST: Conference goes live, keynotes and posters available online, urls sent via email.

9.30: Short introduction and welcome from Sally Bushell

10.00-11.00: First Keynote: James Kneale

11.00-11.30: Live Q&A (chaired by Rebecca Hutcheon)

2.00-3.00: Second Keynote: Anders Engberg-Pedersen

3.00-3.30: Live Q&A (chaired by Duncan Hay)

5.00-6.00: Third Keynote: Robert T. Tally Jr

6.00-6.30: Live Q&A (chaired by Sally Bushell)

In the breaks between sessions, please do browse the online Flickr wall of research posters and hang out in conference virtual chat room.

We very much look forward to seeing you on-screen, on the day (remember it is Tuesday, not Blursday!).

This post is by Digital Curator Stella Wisdom (@miss_wisdom

11 September 2020

BL Labs Public Awards 2020: enter before 0700 GMT Monday 30 November 2020!

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The sixth BL Labs Public Awards 2020 formally recognises outstanding and innovative work that has been carried out using the British Library’s data and / or digital collections by researchers, artists, entrepreneurs, educators, students and the general public.

The closing date for entering the Public Awards is 0700 GMT on Monday 30 November 2020 and you can submit your entry any time up to then.

Please help us spread the word! We want to encourage any one interested to submit over the next few months, who knows, you could even win fame and glory, priceless! We really hope to have another year of fantastic projects to showcase at our annual online awards symposium on the 15 December 2020 (which is open for registration too), inspired by our digital collections and data!

This year, BL Labs is commending work in four key areas that have used or been inspired by our digital collections and data:

  • Research - A project or activity that shows the development of new knowledge, research methods, or tools.
  • Artistic - An artistic or creative endeavour that inspires, stimulates, amazes and provokes.
  • Educational - Quality learning experiences created for learners of any age and ability that use the Library's digital content.
  • Community - Work that has been created by an individual or group in a community.

What kind of projects are we looking for this year?

Whilst we are really happy for you to submit your work on any subject that uses our digital collections, in this significant year, we are particularly interested in entries that may have a focus on anti-racist work or projects about lock down / global pandemic. We are also curious and keen to have submissions that have used Jupyter Notebooks to carry out computational work on our digital collections and data.

After the submission deadline has passed, entries will be shortlisted and selected entrants will be notified via email by midnight on Friday 4th December 2020. 

A prize of £150 in British Library online vouchers will be awarded to the winner and £50 in the same format to the runner up in each Awards category at the Symposium. Of course if you enter, it will be at least a chance to showcase your work to a wide audience and in the past this has often resulted in major collaborations.

The talent of the BL Labs Awards winners and runners up over the last five years has led to the production of remarkable and varied collection of innovative projects described in our 'Digital Projects Archive'. In 2019, the Awards commended work in four main categories – Research, Artistic, Community and Educational:

BL_Labs_Winners_2019-smallBL  Labs Award Winners for 2019
(Top-Left) Full-Text search of Early Music Prints Online (F-TEMPO) - Research, (Top-Right) Emerging Formats: Discovering and Collecting Contemporary British Interactive Fiction - Artistic
(Bottom-Left) John Faucit Saville and the theatres of the East Midlands Circuit - Community commendation
(Bottom-Right) The Other Voice (Learning and Teaching)

For further detailed information, please visit BL Labs Public Awards 2020, or contact us at labs@bl.uk if you have a specific query.

Posted by Mahendra Mahey, Manager of British Library Labs.

01 September 2020

Taking a Virtual Walk on the Wild Side

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For those of us in the northern hemisphere, summer is drawing to a close and autumn feels hot on its heels. On recent walks I’ve noticed blackberries ripening in the hedgerows, tree leaves turning colour and bats darting through the air.

Thinking of nature and the senses, today is the first day of Sound Walk September, the yearly global festival celebrating sound walks. If you want to check some of these out, there is a comprehensive list of walking pieces on their website and also many interesting events planned. Including one about virtual walks; exploring how we can enjoy the great outdoors, by using digital technology to experience virtual nature, when staying indoors.

Blue graphic of a stick person wearing large headphones
Sound Walk September, 1-30 September 2020

We'd love for you to join us for this online Virtual Walks panel discussion on Wednesday 16th September at 7pm (BST), booking details are here.

This event will be chaired by Sue Thomas, author of “Nature and Wellbeing in the Digital Age”, who champions how we can use technology to feel better without logging off.

Sue will be joined by cultural geographer and digital media artist, Jack Lowe, who will talk about a genre of video games known as ‘walking simulators’ and his research in developing location-based online games, as a method of place based digital storytelling.

Virtual Whitby Abbey, one of the British Library’s “Off the Map” gothic winning entries. Created by Team Flying Buttress, i.e. six students from De Montfort University, Ben Mowson, Elliott Pacel, Ewan Couper, Finn McAvinchey, Kit Grande and Katie Hallaron.

Use of atmospheric sound recordings is very much part of the ambience of virtual walking simulators and videogames. Completing the panel will be British Library Wildlife and Environmental Sounds Curator, Cheryl Tipp and myself discussing how digitised sound recordings from the Library’s sound archive have been innovatively used in videogames made by UK students, as part of the "Off the Map" initiative.

If you are inspired to make your own digital sound walk, then you may want to take a read of this previous blog post, which has lots of practical advice. Furthermore, if you use any openly licensed British Library sound recordings in your walk, such as ones on the "Off the Map" SoundCloud Gothic, Alice or Shakespeare sets, or these ones on Wikimedia Commons, then please do let us know by emailing digitalresearch(at)bl(dot)uk, as we always love to share and showcase what people have done with our digital collections.

This post is by Digital Curator Stella Wisdom (@miss_wisdom

04 August 2020

Having a Hoot for International Owl Awareness Day

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Who doesn’t love owls? Here at the British Library we certainly do.

Often used as a symbol of knowledge, they are the perfect library bird. A little owl is associated and frequently depicted with the Greek goddess of wisdom Athena. The University of Bath even awarded Professor Yoda the European eagle owl a library card in recognition of his valuable service deterring seagulls from nesting on their campus.

The British Library may not have issued a reader pass to an owl (as far as I am aware!), but we do have a wealth of owl sound recordings in our wildlife and environmental sounds collection, you can read about and listen to some of these here.

Little Owl calls recorded by Nigel Tucker in Somerset, England (BL ref 124857)

Owls can also be discovered in our UK Web Archive. Our UK Web Archivists recently examined the Shine dataset to explore which UK owl species is the most popular on the archived .uk domain. Read here to find out which owl is the winner.

They also curate an Online Enthusiast Communities in the UK collection, which features bird watching and some owl related websites in the Animal related hobbies subsection. If you know of websites that you think should be included in this collection, then please fill in their online nomination form.

Here in Digital Scholarship I recently found many fabulous illustrations of owls in our Mechanical Curator Flickr image collection of over a million Public Domain images. So to honour owls on International Owl Awareness Day, I put together an owl album.

These owl illustrations are freely available, without copyright restrictions, for all types of creative projects, including digital collages. My colleague Hannah Nagle blogged about making collages recently and provided this handy guide. For finding more general images of nature for your collages, you may find it useful to browse other Mechanical Curator themed albums, such as Flora & Fauna, as these are rich resources for finding illustrations of trees, plants, animals and birds.

If you creatively use our Mechanical Curator Flickr images, please do share them with us on twitter, using the hashtag #BLdigital, we always love to see what people have done with them. Plus if you use any of our owls today, remember to include the #InternationalOwlAwarenessDay hashtag too!

We also urge you to be eagle-eyed (sorry wrong bird!) and look out for some special animated owls during the 4th August, like this one below, which uses both sounds and images taken from our collections. These have been created by Carlos Rarugal, our arty Assistant Web Archivist and will shared from the WildlifeWeb Archive and Digital Scholarship Twitter accounts. 


Video created by Carlos Rarugal,  using Tawny Owl hoots recorded by Richard Margoschis in Gloucestershire, England (BL ref 09647) and British Library digitised image from page 79 of "Woodland Wild: a selection of descriptive poetry. From various authors. With ... illustrations on steel and wood, after R. Bonheur, J. Bonheur, C. Jacque, Veyrassat, Yan Dargent, and other artists"

One of the benefits of making digital art, is that there is no risks of spilling paint or glue on your furniture! As noted in this tweet from Damyanti Patel "Thanks for the instructions, my kids were entertained & I had no mess to clean up after their art so a clear win win, they really enjoyed looking through the albums". I honestly did not ask them to do this, but it is really cool that her children included this fantastic owl in the centre of one of their digital collages:

I quite enjoy it when my library life and goth life connect! During the covid-19 lockdown I have attended several online club nights. A few months ago I was delighted to see that one of these; How Did I Get Here? Alternative 80s Night! regularly uses the British Library Flickr images to create their event flyers, using illustrations of people in strange predicaments to complement the name of their club; like this sad lady sitting inside a bird cage, in the flyer below.

Their next online event is Saturday 22nd August and you can tune in here. If you are a night owl, you could even make some digital collages, while listening to some great tunes. Sounds like a great night in to me!

Illustration of a woman sitting in a bird cage with a book on the floor just outside the cage
Flyer image for How Did I Get Here? Alternative 80s Night!

This post is by Digital Curator Stella Wisdom (@miss_wisdom

22 July 2020

World of Wikimedia

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During recent months of working from home, the Wikimedia family of platforms, including Wikidata and Wikisource, have enabled many librarians and archivists to do meaningful work, to enhance and amplify access to the collections that they curate.

I’ve been very encouraged to learn from other institutions and initiatives who have been working with these platforms. So I recently invited some wonderful speakers to give a “World of Wikimedia” series of remote guest lectures for staff, to inspire my colleagues in the British Library.

Circle of logos from the Wikimedia family of platforms
Logos of the Wikimedia Family of platforms

Stuart Prior from Wikimedia UK kicked off this season with an introduction to Wikimedia and the projects within it, and how it works with galleries, libraries, archives and museums. He was followed by Dr Martin Poulter, who had been the Bodleian Library’s Wikimedian In Residence. Martin shared his knowledge of how books, authors and topics are represented in Wikidata, how Wikidata is used to drive other sites, including Wikipedia, and how Wikipedia combines data and narrative to tell the world about notable books and authors.

Continuing with the theme of books, Gavin Willshaw spoke about the benefits of using Wikisource for optical character recognition (OCR) correction and staff engagement. Giving an overview of the National Library of Scotland’s fantastic project to upload 3,000 digitised Scottish Chapbooks to Wikisource during the Covid-19 lockdown. Focusing on how the project came about, its impact, and how the Library plans to take activity in this area forward in the future.

Illustration of two 18th century men fighting with swords
Tippet is the dandy---o. The toper's advice. Picking lilies. The dying swan, shelfmark L.C.2835(14), from the National Library of Scotland's Scottish Chapbooks collection

Closing the World of Wikimedia season, Adele Vrana and Anasuya Sengupta gave an extremely thought provoking talk about Whose Knowledge? This is a global multilingual campaign, which they co-founded, to centre the knowledges of marginalised communities (the majority of the world) online. Their work includes the annual #VisibleWikiWomen campaign to make women more visible on Wikipedia, which I blogged about recently.

One of the silver linings of the covid-19 lockdown has been that I’ve been able to attend a number of virtual events, which I would not have been able to travel to, if they had been physical events. These have included LD4 Wikidata Affinity Group online meetings; which is a biweekly zoom call on Tuesdays at 9am PDT (5pm BST).

I’ve also remotely attended some excellent online training sessions: “Teaching with Wikipedia: a practical 'how to' workshop” ran by Ewan McAndrew, Wikimedian in Residence at The University of Edinburgh. Also “Wikimedia and Libraries - Running Online Workshops” organised by the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals in Scotland (CILIPS), presented by Dr Sara Thomas, Scotland Programme Coordinator for Wikimedia UK, and previously the Wikimedian in Residence at the Scottish Library and Information Council. From attending the latter, I learned of an online “How to Add Suffragettes & Women Activists to Wikipedia” half day edit-a-thon event taking place on the 4th July organised by Sara, Dr t s Beall and Clare Thompson from the Protests and Suffragettes project, this is a wonderful project, which recovers and celebrates the histories of women activists in Govan, Glasgow.

We have previously held a number of in person Wikipedia edit-a-thon events at the British Library, but this was the first time that I had attended one remotely, via Zoom, so this was a new experience for me. I was very impressed with how it had been organised, using break out rooms for newbies and more experienced editors, including multiple short comfort breaks into the schedule and having very do-able bite size tasks, which were achievable in the time available. They used a comprehensive, but easy to understand, shared spreadsheet for managing the tasks that attendees were working on. This is definitely an approach and a template that I plan to adopt and adapt for any future edit-a-thons I am involved in planning.

Furthermore, it was a very fun and friendly event, the organisers had created We Can [edit]! Zoom background template images for attendees to use, and I learned how to use twinkles on videocalls! This is when attendees raise both hands and wiggle their fingers pointing upwards, to indicate agreement with what is being said, without causing a soundclash. This hand signal has been borrowed it from the American Sign Language word for applause, it is also used by the Green Party and the Occupy Movement.

With enthusiasm fired up from my recent edit-a-thon attending experience, last Saturday I joined the online Wikimedia UK 2020 AGM. Lucy Crompton-Reid, Chief Executive of Wikimedia UK, gave updates on changes in the global Wikimedia movement, such as implementing the 2030 strategy, rebranding Wikimedia, the Universal Code of Conduct and plans for Wikipedia’s 20th birthday. Lucy also announced that three trustees Kelly Foster, Nick Poole and Doug Taylor, who stood for the board were all elected. Nick and Doug have both been on the board since July 2015 and were re-elected. I was delighted to learn that Kelly is a new trustee joining the board for the first time. As Kelly has previously been a trainer at BL Wikipedia edit-a-thon events, and she coached me to create my first Wikipedia article on Coventry godcakes at a Wiki-Food and (mostly) Women edit-a-thon in 2017.

In addition to these updates, Gavin Willshaw, gave a keynote presentation about the NLS Scottish chapbooks Wikisource project that I mentioned earlier, and there were three lightning talks: Andy Mabbett; 'Wiki Hates Newbies', Clare Thompson, Lesley Mitchell and Dr t s Beall; 'Protests and Suffragettes: Highlighting 100 years of women’s activism in Govan, Glasgow, Scotland' and Jason Evans; 'An update from Wales'.

Before the event ended, there was a 2020 Wikimedia UK annual awards announcement, where libraries and librarians did very well indeed:

  • UK Wikimedian of the Year was awarded to librarian Caroline Ball for education work and advocacy at the University of Derby (do admire her amazing Wikipedia dress in the embedded tweet below!)
  • Honourable Mention to Ian Watt for outreach work, training, and efforts around Scotland's COVID-19 data
  • Partnership of the Year was given to National Library of Scotland for the WikiSource chapbooks project led by Gavin Willshaw
  • Honourable Mention to University of Edinburgh for work in education and Wikidata
  • Up and Coming Wikimedian was a joint win to Emma Carroll for work on the Scottish Witch data project and Laura Wood Rose for work at University of Edinburgh and on the Women in Red initiative
  • Michael Maggs was given an Honorary Membership, in recognition of his very significant contribution to the charity over a number of years.

Big congratulations to all the winners. Their fantastic work, and also in Caroline's case, her fashion sense, is inspirational!

For anyone interested, the next online event that I’m planning to attend is a #WCCWiki Colloquium organised by The Women’s Classical Committee, which aims to increase the representation of women classicists on Wikipedia. Maybe I’ll virtually see you there…

This post is by Digital Curator Stella Wisdom (@miss_wisdom

14 July 2020

Legacies of Catalogue Descriptions and Curatorial Voice: Training Sessions

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This guest post is by James Baker, Senior Lecturer in Digital History and Archives at the University of Sussex.

This month the team behind "Legacies of Catalogue Descriptions and Curatorial Voice: Opportunities for Digital Scholarship" ran two training sessions as part of our Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project. Each standalone session provided instruction in using the software tool AntConc and approaches from computational linguistics for the purposes of examining catalogue data. The objectives of the sessions were twofold: to test our in-development training materials, and to seek feedback from the community in order to better understand their needs and to develop our training offer.

Rather than host open public training, we decided to foster existing partnerships by inviting a small number of individuals drawn from attendees at events hosted as part of our previous Curatorial Voice project (funded by the British Academy). In total thirteen individuals from the UK and US took part across the two sessions, with representatives from libraries, archives, museums, and galleries.

Screenshot of the website for the lesson entitled Computational Analysis of Catalogue Data

Screenshot of the content page and timetable for the lesson
Carpentries-style lesson about analysing catalogue data in Antconc


The training was delivered in the style of a Software Carpentry workshop, drawing on their wonderful lesson templatepedagogical principles, and rapid response to moving coding and data science instruction online in light of the Covid-19 crisis (see ‘Recommendations for Teaching Carpentries Workshops Online’ and ‘Tips for Teaching Online from The Carpentries Community’). In terms of content, we started with the basics: how to get data into AntConc, the layout of AntConc, and settings in AntConc. After that we worked through two substantial modules. The first focused on how to generate, interact with, and interpret a word list, and this was followed by a module on searching, adapting, and reading concordances. The tasks and content of both modules avoided generic software instruction and instead focused on the analysis of free text catalogue fields, with attendees asked to consider what they might infer about a catalogue from its use of tense, what a high volume of capitalised words might tell us about cataloguing style, and how adverb use might be a useful proxy for the presence of controlled vocabulary.

Screenshot of three tasks and solutions in the Searching Concordances section
Tasks in the Searching Concordances section

Running Carpentries-style training over Zoom was new to me, and was - frankly - very odd. During live coding I missed hearing the clack of keyboards as people followed along in response. I missed seeing the sticky notes go up as people completed the task at hand. During exercises I missed hearing the hubbub that accompanies pair programming. And more generally, without seeing the micro-gestures of concentration, relief, frustration, and joy on the faces of learners, I felt somehow isolated as an instructor from the process of learning.

But from the feedback we received the attendees appear to have been happy. It seems we got the pace right (we assumed teaching online would be slower than face-to-face, and it was). The attendees enjoyed using AntConc and were surprised, to quote one attendees, "to see just how quickly you could draw some conclusions". The breakout rooms we used for exercises were a hit. And importantly we have a clear steer on next steps: that we should pivot to a dataset that better reflects the diversity of catalogue data (for this exercise we used a catalogue of printed images that I know very well), that learners would benefit having a list of suggested readings and resources on corpus linguistics, and that we might - to quote one attendee - provide "more examples up front of the kinds of finished research that has leveraged this style of analysis".

These comments and more will feed into the development of our training materials, which we hope to complete by the end of 2020 and - in line with the open values of the project - is happening in public. In the meantime, the materials are there for the community to use, adapt and build on (more or less) as they wish. Should you take a look and have any thoughts on what we might change or include for the final version, we always appreciate an email or a note on our issue tracker.

"Legacies of Catalogue Descriptions and Curatorial Voice: Opportunities for Digital Scholarship" is a collaboration between the Sussex Humanities Lab, the British Library, and Yale University Library that is funded under the Arts and Humanities Research Council (UK) “UK-US Collaboration for Digital Scholarship in Cultural Institutions: Partnership Development Grants” scheme. Project Reference AH/T013036/1.

10 June 2020

International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling 2020: Call for Papers, Posters and Interactive Creative Works

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It has been heartening to see many joyful responses to our recent post featuring The British Library Simulator; an explorable, miniature, virtual version of the British Library’s building in St Pancras.

If you would like to learn more about our Emerging Formats research, which is informing our work in collecting examples of complex digital publications, including works made with Bitsy, then my colleague Giulia Carla Rossi (who built the Bitsy Library) is giving a Leeds Libraries Tech Talk on Digital Literature and Interactive Storytelling this Thursday, 11th June at 12 noon, via Zoom.

Giulia will be joined by Leeds Libraries Central Collections Manager, Rhian Isaac, who will showcase some of Leeds Libraries exciting collections, and also Izzy Bartley, Digital Learning Officer from Leeds Museums and Galleries, who will talk about her role in making collections interactive and accessible. Places are free, but please book here.

If you are a researcher, or writer/artist/maker, of experimental interactive digital stories, then you may want to check out the current call for submissions for The International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling (ICIDS), organised by the Association for Research in Digital Interactive Narratives, a community of academics and practitioners concerned with the advancement of all forms of interactive narrative. The deadline for proposing Research Papers, Exhibition Submissions, Posters and Demos, has been extended to the 26th June 2020, submissions can be made via the ICIDS 2020 EasyChair Site.

The ICIDS 2020 dates, 3-6 November, on a photograph of Bournemouth beach

ICIDS showcases and shares research and practice in game narrative and interactive storytelling, including the theoretical, technological, and applied design practices. It is an interdisciplinary gathering that combines computational narratology, narrative systems, storytelling technology, humanities-inspired theoretical inquiry, empirical research and artistic expression.

For 2020, the special theme is Interactive Digital Narrative Scholarship, and ICIDS will be hosted by the Department of Creative Technology of Bournemouth University (also hosts of the New Media Writing Prize, which I have blogged about previously). Their current intention is to host a mixed virtual and physical conference. They are hoping that the physical meeting will still take place, but all talks and works will also be made available virtually for those who are unable to attend physically due to the COVID-19 situation. This means that if you submit work, you will still need to register and present your ideas, but for those who are unable to travel to Bournemouth, the conference organisers will be making allowances for participants to contribute virtually.

ICIDS also includes a creative exhibition, showcasing interactive digital artworks, which for 2020 will explore the curatorial theme “Texts of Discomfort”. The exhibition call is currently seeking Interactive digital art works that generate discomfort through their form and/or their content, which may also inspire radical changes in the way we perceive the world.

Creatives are encouraged to mix technologies, narratives, points of view, to create interactive digital artworks that unsettle interactors’ assumptions by tackling the world’s global issues; and/or to create artworks that bring to a crisis interactors’ relation with language, that innovate in their way to intertwine narrative and technology. Artworks can include, but are not limited to:

  • Augmented, mixed and virtual reality works
  • Computer games
  • Interactive installations
  • Mobile and location-based works
  • Screen-based computational works
  • Web-based works
  • Webdocs and interactive films
  • Transmedia works

Submissions to the ICIDS art exhibition should be made using this form by 26th June. Any questions should be sent to icids2020arts@gmail.com. Good luck!

This post is by Digital Curator Stella Wisdom (@miss_wisdom

29 May 2020

IIIF Week 2020

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As a founding member of the International Image Interoperability Framework Consortium (IIIF), here at the British Library we are looking forward to the upcoming IIIF Week, which has organised a programme of free online events taking place during 1-5 June.

IIIF Week sessions will discuss digital strategy for cultural heritage, introduce IIIF’s capabilities and community through introductory presentations and demonstrations of use cases. Plus explore the future of IIIF and digital research needs more broadly. 

IIIF logo with text saying International Image Interoperability Framework

Converting the IIIF annual conference into a virtual event held using Zoom, provides an opportunity to bring together a wider group of the IIIF community. Enabling many to attend, including myself, who otherwise would not have been able join the in-person event in Boston, due to budget, travel restrictions, and other obligations.

Both IIIF newbies and experienced implementers will find events scheduled at convenient times, to allow attendees to form regional community connections in their parts of the world. Attendees can sign up for all events during the week, or just the ones that interest them. Proceedings will be in English unless otherwise indicated, and all sessions will be recorded, then made available following the conference on the IIIF YouTube channel.

To those who know me, it will come as no surprise that I’m especially looking forward to the Fun with IIIF session on Friday 5 June, 4-5pm BST, facilitated by Tristan Roddis from Cogapp. Most of the uses of the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) have focused on scholarly and research applications. This session, however, will look at the opposite extreme: the state of the art for creating playful and fun applications of the IIIF APIs. From tile puzzles, to arcade games, via terapixel fractals, virtual galleries, 3D environments, and the Getty's really cool Nintendo Animal Crossing integration.

In addition to the IIIF Week programme, aimed for anyone wanting a more in-depth and practical hands-on teaching, there is a free workshop on getting started with IIIF, the week following the online conference. This pilot course will run over 5 days between 8-12 June, participation is limited to 25 places, available on a first come, first served basis. It will cover:

  • Getting started with the Image API
  • Creating IIIF Manifests with the Bodleian manifest editor
  • Annotating IIIF resources and setting up an annotation server
  • Introduction to various IIIF tools and techniques for scholarship

Tutors will assist participants to create a IIIF project and demonstrate it on a zoom call at the end of the week.

You can view and sign up for IIIF Week events at https://iiif.io/event/2020/iiifweek/. All attendees are expected to adhere to the IIIF Code of Conduct and encouraged to join the IIIF-Week Slack channel for ongoing questions, comments, and discussion (you’ll need to join the IIIF Slack first, which is open to anyone).

For following and participating in more open discussion on twitter, use the hashtags #IIIF and #IIIFWeek, and if you have any specific questions about the event, please get in touch with the IIIF staff at events@iiif.io.

See you there :-)

This post is by Digital Curator Stella Wisdom (@miss_wisdom