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16 posts categorized "Middle East"

03 October 2019

BL Labs Symposium (2019): Book your place for Mon 11-Nov-2019

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Posted by Mahendra Mahey, Manager of BL Labs

The BL Labs team are pleased to announce that the seventh annual British Library Labs Symposium will be held on Monday 11 November 2019, from 9:30 - 17:00* (see note below) in the British Library Knowledge Centre, St Pancras. The event is FREE, and you must book a ticket in advance to reserve your place. Last year's event was the largest we have ever held, so please don't miss out and book early!

*Please note, that directly after the Symposium, we have teamed up with an interactive/immersive theatre company called 'Uninvited Guests' for a specially organised early evening event for Symposium attendees (the full cost is £13 with some concessions available). Read more at the bottom of this posting!

The Symposium showcases innovative and inspiring projects which have used the British Library’s digital content. Last year's Award winner's drew attention to artistic, research, teaching & learning, and commercial activities that used our digital collections.

The annual event provides a platform for the development of ideas and projects, facilitating collaboration, networking and debate in the Digital Scholarship field as well as being a focus on the creative reuse of the British Library's and other organisations' digital collections and data in many other sectors. Read what groups of Master's Library and Information Science students from City University London (#CityLIS) said about the Symposium last year.

We are very proud to announce that this year's keynote will be delivered by scientist Armand Leroi, Professor of Evolutionary Biology at Imperial College, London.

Armand Leroi
Professor Armand Leroi from Imperial College
will be giving the keynote at this year's BL Labs Symposium (2019)

Professor Armand Leroi is an author, broadcaster and evolutionary biologist.

He has written and presented several documentary series on Channel 4 and BBC Four. His latest documentary was The Secret Science of Pop for BBC Four (2017) presenting the results of the analysis of over 17,000 western pop music from 1960 to 2010 from the US Bill Board top 100 charts together with colleagues from Queen Mary University, with further work published by through the Royal Society. Armand has a special interest in how we can apply techniques from evolutionary biology to ask important questions about culture, humanities and what is unique about us as humans.

Previously, Armand presented Human Mutants, a three-part documentary series about human deformity for Channel 4 and as an award winning book, Mutants: On Genetic Variety and Human Body. He also wrote and presented a two part series What Makes Us Human also for Channel 4. On BBC Four Armand presented the documentaries What Darwin Didn't Know and Aristotle's Lagoon also releasing the book, The Lagoon: How Aristotle Invented Science looking at Aristotle's impact on Science as we know it today.

Armands' keynote will reflect on his interest and experience in applying techniques he has used over many years from evolutionary biology such as bioinformatics, data-mining and machine learning to ask meaningful 'big' questions about culture, humanities and what makes us human.

The title of his talk will be 'The New Science of Culture'. Armand will follow in the footsteps of previous prestigious BL Labs keynote speakers: Dan Pett (2018); Josie Fraser (2017); Melissa Terras (2016); David De Roure and George Oates (2015); Tim Hitchcock (2014); Bill Thompson and Andrew Prescott in 2013.

The symposium will be introduced by the British Library's new Chief Librarian Liz Jolly. The day will include an update and exciting news from Mahendra Mahey (BL Labs Manager at the British Library) about the work of BL Labs highlighting innovative collaborations BL Labs has been working on including how it is working with Labs around the world to share experiences and knowledge, lessons learned . There will be news from the Digital Scholarship team about the exciting projects they have been working on such as Living with Machines and other initiatives together with a special insight from the British Library’s Digital Preservation team into how they attempt to preserve our digital collections and data for future generations.

Throughout the day, there will be several announcements and presentations showcasing work from nominated projects for the BL Labs Awards 2019, which were recognised last year for work that used the British Library’s digital content in Artistic, Research, Educational and commercial activities.

There will also be a chance to find out who has been nominated and recognised for the British Library Staff Award 2019 which highlights the work of an outstanding individual (or team) at the British Library who has worked creatively and originally with the British Library's digital collections and data (nominations close midday 5 November 2019).

As is our tradition, the Symposium will have plenty of opportunities for networking throughout the day, culminating in a reception for delegates and British Library staff to mingle and chat over a drink and nibbles.

Finally, we have teamed up with the interactive/immersive theatre company 'Uninvited Guests' who will give a specially organised performance for BL Labs Symposium attendees, directly after the symposium. This participatory performance will take the audience on a journey through a world that is on the cusp of a technological disaster. Our period of history could vanish forever from human memory because digital information will be wiped out for good. How can we leave a trace of our existence to those born later? Don't miss out on a chance to book on this unique event at 5pm specially organised to coincide with the end of the BL Labs Symposium. For more information, and for booking (spaces are limited), please visit here (the full cost is £13 with some concessions available). Please note, if you are unfortunate in not being able to join the 5pm show, there will be another performance at 1945 the same evening (book here for that one).

So don't forget to book your place for the Symposium today as we predict it will be another full house again and we don't want you to miss out.

We look forward to seeing new faces and meeting old friends again!

For any further information, please contact labs@bl.uk

13 September 2019

Results of the RASM2019 Competition on Recognition of Historical Arabic Scientific Manuscripts

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This blog post is by Dr Adi Keinan-Schoonbaert, Digital Curator for Asian and African Collections, British Library. She's on Twitter as @BL_AdiKS.

 

Earlier this year, the British Library in collaboration with PRImA Research Lab and the Alan Turing Institute launched a competition on the Recognition of Historical Arabic Scientific Manuscripts, or in short, RASM2019. This competition was held in the context of the 15th International Conference on Document Analysis and Recognition (ICDAR2019). It was the second competition of this type, following RASM2018 which took place in 2018.

The Library has an extensive collection of Arabic manuscripts, comprising of almost 15,000 works. We have been digitising several hundred manuscripts as part of the British Library/Qatar Foundation Partnership, making them available on Qatar Digital Library. A natural next-step would be the creation of machine-readable content from scanned images, for enhanced search and whole new avenues of research.

Running a competition helps us identify software providers and tool developers, as well as introduce us to the specific challenges that pattern recognition systems face when dealing with historic, handwritten materials. For this year’s competition we provided a ground truth set of 120 images and associated XML files: 20 pages to be used to train text recognition systems to automatically identify Arabic script, and a 100 pages to evaluate the training.

Aside from providing larger training and evaluation sets, for this year’s competition we’ve added an extra challenge – marginalia. Notes written in the margins are often less consistent and less coherent than main blocks of text, and can go in different directions. The competition set out three different challenges: page segmentation, text line detection and Optical Character Recognition (OCR). Tackling marginalia was a bonus challenge!

We had just one submission for this year’s competition – RDI Company, Cairo University, who previously participated in 2018 and did very well. RDI submitted three different methods, and participated in two challenges: text line segmentation and OCR. When evaluating the results, PRImA compared established systems used in industry and academia – Tesseract 4.0, ABBYY FineReader Engine 12 (FRE12), and Google Cloud Vision API – to RDI’s submitted methods. The evaluation approach was the same as last year’s, with PRImA evaluating page analysis and recognition methods using different evaluation metrics, in order to gain an insight into the algorithms.

 

Results

Challenge 1 - Page Layout Analysis

The first challenge was set out to identify regions in a page, and find out where blocks of text are located on the page. RDI did not participate in this challenge, therefore an analysis was made only on common industry software mentioned above. The results can be seen in the chart below:

Chart showing RASM2019 page segmentation results
Chart showing RASM2019 page segmentation results

 

Google did relatively well here, and the results are quite similar to last year’s. Despite dealing with the more challenging marginalia text, Google’s previous accuracy score (70.6%) has gone down only very slightly to a still impressive 69.3%.

Example image showing Google’s page segmentation
Example image showing Google’s page segmentation

 

Tesseract 4 and FRE12 scored very similarly, with Tesseract decreasing from last year’s 54.5%. Interestingly, FRE12’s performance on text blocks including marginalia (42.5%) was better than last year’s FRE11 performance without marginalia, scoring at 40.9%. Analysis showed that Tesseract and FRE often misclassified text areas as illustrations, with FRE doing better than Tesseract in this regard.

 

Challenge 2 - Text Line Segmentation

The second challenge looked into segmenting text into distinct text lines. RDI submitted three methods for this challenge, all of which returned the text lines of the main text block (as they did not wish to participate in the marginalia challenge). Results were then compared with Tesseract and FineReader, and are reflected below:

Chart showing RASM2019 text line segmentation results
Chart showing RASM2019 text line segmentation results

 

RDI did very well with its three methods, with an accuracy level ranging between 76.6% and 77.6%. However, despite not attempting to segments marginalia text lines, their methods did not perform as well as last year’s method (with 81.6% accuracy). Their methods did seem to detect some marginalia, though very little overall, as seen in the screenshot below.

Example image showing RDI’s text line segmentation results
Example image showing RDI’s text line segmentation results

 

Tesseract and FineReader again scored lower than RDI, both with decreasing accuracy compared to RASM2018’s results (Tesseract 4 with 44.2%, FRE11 with 43.2%). This is due to the additional marginalia challenge. The Google method does not detect text lines, therefore the Text Line chart above does not include their results.

 

Challenge 3 - OCR Accuracy

The third and last challenge was all about text recognition, tackling the correct identification of characters and words in the text. Evaluation for this challenge was conducted four times: 1) on the whole page, including marginalia, 2) only on main blocks of text, excluding marginalia, 3) using the original texts, and 4) using normalised texts. Text normalisation was performed for both ground truth and OCR results, due to the historic nature of the material, occasional unusual spelling, and use/lack of diacritics. All methods performed slightly better when not tested on marginalia; accuracy rates are demonstrated in the charts below:

Chart showing OCR accuracy results, for main text body only (normalised, no marginalia)
Chart showing OCR accuracy results, for main text body only (normalised, no marginalia)
 
Chart showing OCR accuracy results for all text regions (normalised, with marginalia)
Chart showing OCR accuracy results for all text regions (normalised, with marginalia)

 

It is evident that there are minor differences in the character accuracies for the three RDI methods, with RDI2 performing slightly better than the others. When comparing the OCR accuracy between texts with and without marginalia, there are slightly higher success rates for the latter, though the difference is not significant. This means that tested methods performed on the marginalia almost as well as they did on the main text, which is encouraging.

Comparing RASM2018’s results, RDI’s results are good but not as good as last year (with 85.44% accuracy), likely to be a result of adding marginalia to the recognition challenge. Google performed very well too, considering they did not specifically train or optimised for this competition. Tesseract’s results went down from 30.45% to 25.13%, and FineReader Engine 12 performed better than its previous version FRE11, going up from 12.23% to 17.53% accuracy. However, it is still very low, as handwritten texts are not part of their target material.

 

Further Thoughts

RDI-Corporation has its own historical Arabic handwritten and typewritten OCR system, which has been built using different historical manuscripts. Its methods have done well, given the very challenging nature of the documents. Neither Tesseract nor ABBYY FineReader produce usable results, but that’s not surprising since they are both optimised for printed texts, and target contemporary material and not historical manuscripts.

As next steps, we would like to test these materials with Transkribus, which produced promising results for early printed Indian texts (see e.g. Tom Derrick’s blog post – stay tuned for some even more impressive results!), and potentially Kraken as well. All ground truth will be released through the Library’s future Open Access repository (now in testing phase), as well as through the website of IMPACT Centre for Competence. Watch this space for any developments!

 

14 June 2019

Palestine Open Maps mapathon: follow up and data usage experiments

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This guest post is by Majd Al-Shihabi, he is a systems design engineer and urban planning graduate student at the American University of Beirut. He is the inaugural recipient of the Bassel Khartabil Free Culture Fellowship. You can find him on Twitter as @majdal.

 

Last Saturday, the British Library hosted a mapathon run by Palestine Open Maps team to vectorise the map content of 155 maps made at 1:20,000 scale by the British Mandate of Palestine.

Before the mapathon itself, I visited the maps collection at the Library, and after working with the maps for almost two years, I finally saw the original maps in physical form.

About 35 mappers participated in the mapathon, and they vectorised content covering most of historic Palestine. The flashing features in the animation below are the ones created through the mapathon.

View post on imgur.com

They include hundreds of features, including cisterns, schools, police stations, places of worship, parts of the road network, residential areas, and more.

Some of the features, such as towns, had Wikipedia articles and Wikidata items, which we linked to the map data as well.

Often, we are asked, what happens with the data that we produce through those mapathons? First and foremost, it is available for download here, under an Open Data Commons Attribution License.

The data is already being used by other projects. For example, Ahmad Barclay, a partner in the Palestine Open Maps project, has collaborated with the Palestinian Oral History Archive, to map all landmarks mentioned in testimonies by Palestinians recounting life in Palestine before the 1948 Nakba. The result is a map that serves as a spatial way of navigating oral history. View the map here.

 

19 March 2019

BL Labs 2018 Commercial Award Runner Up: 'The Seder Oneg Shabbos Bentsher'

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This guest blog was written by David Zvi Kalman on behalf of the team that received the runner up award in the 2018 BL Labs Commercial category.

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The bentsher is a strange book, both invisible and highly visible. It is not among the more well known Jewish books, like the prayerbook, Hebrew Bible, or haggadah. You would be hard pressed to find a general-interest bookstore selling a copy. Still, enter the house of a traditional Jew and you’d likely find at least a few, possibly a few dozen. In Orthodox communities, the bentsher is arguably the most visible book of all.

Bentshers are handbooks containing the songs and blessings, including the Grace after Meals, that are most useful for Sabbath and holiday meals, as well as larger gatherings. They are, as a rule, quite small. These days, bentshers are commonly given out as party favors at Jewish weddings and bar/bat mitzvahs, since meals at those events require them anyway. Many bentshers today have personalized covers relating the events at which they were given.

Bentshers have never gone out of print. By this I mean that printing began with the invention of the printing press and has never stopped. They are small, but they have always been useful. Seder Oneg Shabbos, the version which I designed, was released 500 years after the first bentsher was published. It is, in a sense, a Half Millennium Anniversary Special Edition.

SederOneg_4

Bentshers, like other Jewish books, could be quite ornate; some were written and illustrated by hand. Over the years, however, bentshers have become less and less interesting, largely in order to lower the unit cost. In order to make it feasible for wedding planners to order hundreds at a time, all images were stripped from the books, the books themselves became very small, and any interest in elegant typography was quickly eliminated. My grandfather, who designed custom covers for wedding bentshers, simply called the book, “the insert.” Custom prayerbooks were no different from custom matchbooks.

This particular bentsher was created with the goal of bucking this trend; I attempted to give the book the feel of the some of the Jewish books and manuscripts of the past, using the research I was able to gather a graduate student in the field of Jewish history. Doing this required a great deal of image research; for this, the British Library’s online resources were incredible valuable. Of the more than one hundred images in the book, a plurality are from the British Library’s collections.

https://data.bl.uk/hebrewmanuscripts/

https://www.bl.uk/hebrew-manuscripts

OS_36_37

In addition to its visual element, this bentsher differs from others in two important ways. First, it contains ritual languages that is inclusive of those in the LGBTQ community, and especially for those conducting same-sex weddings. In addition, the book contains songs not just in Hebrew, but in Yiddish, as well; this was a homage to two Yiddishists who aided in creating the bentsher’s content. The bentsher was first used at their wedding.

SederOneg_3

More here: https://shabb.es/sederonegshabbos/

Watch David accepting the runner up award and talking about the Seder Oneg Shabbos Bentsher on our YouTube channel (clip runs from 5.33 to 7.26): 

David Zvi Kalman was responsible for the book’s design, including the choice of images. He is a doctoral candidate at the University of Pennsylvania, where he focuses on the relationship between Jewish history and the history of technology. Sarah Wolf is a specialist in rabbinics and is an assistant professor at the Jewish Theology Seminary of America. Joshua Schwartz is a doctoral student at New York University, where he studies Jewish mysticism. Sarah and Joshua were responsible for most of the books translations and transliterations. Yocheved and Yudis Retig are Yiddishists and were responsible for the book’s Yiddish content and translations.

Find out more about Digital Scholarship and BL Labs. If you have a project which uses British Library digital content in innovative and interesting ways, consider applying for an award this year! The 2019 BL Labs Symposium will take place on Monday 11 November at the British Library.

01 February 2019

The British Library / Qatar Foundation Partnership Imaging Hack Day – Part 2

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On 25th October the BL/QFP team held their first Hack Day. The original concept, as well as the planning and run up to the day were previously discussed in a blog piece by Sotirios Alpanis, but here, I am excited to present details of the day itself and its results.

On the morning of the Hack Day, there was a creative buzz in the air as the digitisation studio transformed into an artist’s workshop. Free from the strict guidelines for imaging and quality assurance, there were no targets to meet, and the only brief was to engage creatively with the collection. Throughout the day, there was a noticeable stream of movement back and forth between the sixth floor office and the Imaging studio. Elizabeth Hunter and Carl Norman from Imaging Services South were in and out all day to check on the three cameras they had set up in different corners of the studio to record a time-lapse video of all the activities, and many members of the wider team dropped in for conversation.

At the end of the day, the team gave short informal presentations on their individual projects. The projects revealed a variety of skills and a wide range of ideas. Some linked with each other contextually, whilst others resulted from collaboration with members of the wider team - hence the frequent visits by staff from the main office!

Matt and Melanie working on their hacks


The hacks

Daniel Loveday was interested in colourisation, setting out to add historically accurate colours to black and white photographic images. With assistance from Louis Allday, Gulf History Content Specialist, he worked on a portrait of the Sharif of Mecca. Louis speculated that the ‘turban would have been white, a colour of turban that was often worn by Sayyids (descendants of the Prophet Muhammad, which he was) and as worn by a later Sharif of Mecca, Husayn’. He also suggested that the gown ‘would be similar to European-style naval dress (dark/navy blue with gold detailing) as the dress of late Ottoman era officials such as this was heavily influenced by European military forms at the time.’ The last piece of clothing to colour was the sash across the body which Louis reasoned ‘would possibly be green, a colour also closely associated with the Prophet, his family and his descendants.’

Sharif of Mecca


Coming from a different angle, Melanie Taylor explored the potential to form new relationships and striking visual narratives from digitised content. Reflecting on how imaging technicians engage with content, Melanie’s project directed focus to the purely visual qualities of digitised items. Drawing on hundreds of images, her results were poetic and illuminating. The wider BL/QFP team, who usually look at the material through the eyes of a reader or researcher, appreciated this fresh perspective.

Visual Narratives 1
Visual Narratives 2
Visual Narratives 3

Matt’s Lee work also evolved from acts of repetition. Placing images of parallel or similar things side by side, he was able to create interesting patterns, comparisons and meanings. These visual typologies included lists of dates, places, signatures, and logos. Louis suggested a typology made from ‘the names of the numerous states of the area that was to become Saudi Arabia in 1932, including both earlier (and smaller) incarnations of the Saudi state and other rival kingdoms and emirates that it conquered.’ This idea remains a work in progress.

Visual typology (stamps, crests and logos)

Visual typology (Muscat typography)

Darran Murray and Jordi Clopes Masjuan were both inspired by an astrolabe quadrant from ‘Two treatises on Astronomy by Sibṭ al-Māridīnī’, albeit in very different ways. Jordi sought to capture images highlighting the quadrant’s shape and texture, emphasising its beauty as an artefact. Owing to pressures of time, copy stand photography in digitisation projects doesn’t usually allow for experimentation with lighting techniques; and, in the interests of consistency, the colour of the backing paper remains the same throughout. Here, however, Jordi specifically matched the paper to the quadrant, and thus effectively revealed more details of its edges.

Astrolabe quadrant before and after

Astrolabe quadrant and the ‘Four treatises on Astronomy‘

Darran investigated the quadrant’s practical function and educational qualities by creating a guide on ‘How to build and use your very own Astrolabe.’ He went on to make a paper version of the wooden device himself.

Astrolabe quadrant model

Darran’s guide would be beautifully illustrated by both of these projects!


The next project also had an educational purpose and aimed to make the resources of the QDL more accessible to visitors who may be less familiar with Gulf and Middle Eastern history. Combining storytelling, maps and images, they created an interactive version of a tour by Political Resident, Geoffrey Prior, from Bahrain to Muscat, in February 1940, transporting the viewer to the different locations where particular events took place. To do this, they used a JavaScript tool called Story Map by Knight Lab, the Northwestern University, which is user friendly and can be embedded in a website. Unsurprisingly, the idea generated a lot of interest and further ideas for telling other stories in similar ways.

 

Rebecca Harris wanted to digitise landscape and aerial photographs using a macro lens in order to ‘bring the viewers’ attention to details and fragments which would otherwise go unnoticed.’ Using her computer screen like a magnifying glass, she examined topographical features found in shelfmarks IOR/R/15/1/606 and IOR/L/PS/12/1956, and was able to identify potential coordinates.

Macro experiments

Similarly to Daniel, Hannah Nagle has focused on colourisation. She drew inspiration from early autochrome images of the Middle East found in Albert Kahn’s collection ‘The Archives of the Planet’. She coloured a black and white photograph depicting a group of women in Linga, Persia, skilfully conveying the atmosphere of the region at the beginning of the twentieth century.

Colourised black and white image


At the end of the day, I hacked my own shelfmark as well, 'Four treatises on Astronomy'. I picked a manuscript damaged by insects and with assistance from our Conservation Team Manager Salvador Alcantra Pelaez, I photographed it on contrasting paper. Later the pages were digitally removed in order to draw attention to the damage. All the images were combined in an animation showing insects’ impact on the manuscript.

Capturing ‘Four treatises on Astronomy’

Marks of insect damage

The first Hack Day was an all-round success. It was interesting for the wider team to see how imaging technicians engaged creatively with the material we are digitising. Furthermore, to observe what collaborations formed and how knowledge was shared amongst different areas of the project.

A week after the Hack Day, we ran a retrospective meeting, where we unanimously decided to repeat the activity on quarterly basis. We gathered a lot of feedback and scheduled the next Hack Day for the 7th February. I can reveal that this time the Imaging team will be responding to a theme, watch this space for more hacks!

Hack Day poster

Hack Day poster

This is a guest post by Renata Kaminska, Digitisation Studio Manager for the British Library's Qatar Project

 

19 November 2018

The British Library / Qatar Foundation Partnership Imaging Hack Day

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The BL/QFP is digitising archive material related to Persian Gulf History as well as Arabic scientific manuscripts, in the past four years we have added in excess of 1.5 million images to the Qatar Digital Library. Our team of ~45 staff includes a group of eight dedicated imaging professionals, who between them produce 30,000 digitised images each month, to exacting standards that focus on presenting the information on the page in a visually clear and consistent manner.

 

Our imaging team are a highly-skilled group, with a variety of backgrounds, experiences and talents, and we wished to harness these. Therefore, we decided to set aside a day for our Imaging team to use their creative and technical skills to ‘hack’ the material in our collection.

By dedicating a whole day for our imaging team to experiment with different ways of capturing the material we are digitising we hoped it would reveal some interesting aspects of the collection, which were not seen through our standardised capture process. It also gave the Imaging team a chance to show off and share their skills amongst themselves and the wider BL/QFP team.

This was how we conceived of our first Imaging Hack Day, and the rest of this blog post outlines how we promoted and organised it.

From its conception the Imaging team were keen for the wider team to be involved, so we asked them to nominate material from the collections we are digitising that they thought could be ‘hacked’ and to state their reasons why.

To begin with it was mostly members of the Imaging team that nominated items. So we decided to wage a PR campaign: firstly the Imaging team delivered a presentation on the 9th of October at one of BL/QFP’s all-staff meetings. The presentation outlined some of the techniques and ideas they had for the hack day, in order to appeal to the rest of the team for nominations. Additionally, on the morning of the 9th members of the Imaging team snuck into the office and planted some not-so-subtle propaganda:

Posters

The impact of the posters and presentation was really pronounced. After having a handful of nominations from people outside of the Imaging team before 9th Oct, within days the number had increased by a factor in excess of five (see graph below). The posters also became highly sought after amongst the team.

Nominations
Graph showing how many shelfmarks were nominated each day, with cumulative totals for members of the imaging team vs non-imaging teams.

 

The day before the Hack Day, anyone who had nominated an item was invited to a prep session with the Imaging team. Here the nominated items were presented, as well as the ideas for hacks. Extra judicious use of Post-Its and Sharpies facilitated feedback, and by the end of the session the Imaging team were armed with lots of ideas, encouragement, and knew they had curatorial expertise from the rest of the BL/QFP team to call upon if necessary.

Postits

As a final surprise, and a sign of appreciation Hack Sacks filled with goodies were secreted into the imaging studio late on the eve of the Hack Day:

Hacksacks

The resulting images/hacks of the Hack Day will be covered in an upcoming post by our studio manager Renata Kaminska. However, in addition the non-material results were manifold. Throughout the lead-up and on the actual day there was a palpable buzz amongst the Imaging team, evidence of the positive impact on their morale. It also led to a greater exchange of knowledge between the Imaging team and their colleagues throughout the BL/QFP. The day allowed for different areas of the team to come together, combine their expertise and find new ways of working and innovative ways of capturing our collections. Finally, it also demonstrated the fantastic experience and skills of our imaging technicians, many of which had not previously been exposed to the rest of the team. It was a real celebration of both the material that we are digitising and our talented imaging studio.

This is a guest post by Sotirios Alpanis, Head of Digital Operations for the British Library's Qatar Project, on Twitter as @SotiriosAlpanis

23 August 2018

BL Labs Symposium (2018): Book your place for Mon 12-Nov-2018

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The BL Labs team are pleased to announce that the sixth annual British Library Labs Symposium will be held on Monday 12 November 2018, from 9:30 - 17:30 in the British Library Knowledge Centre, St Pancras. The event is free, and you must book a ticket in advance. Last year's event was a sell out, so don't miss out!

The Symposium showcases innovative and inspiring projects which use the British Library’s digital content, providing a platform for development, networking and debate in the Digital Scholarship field as well as being a focus on the creative reuse of digital collections and data in the cultural heritage sector.

We are very proud to announce that this year's keynote will be delivered by Daniel Pett, Head of Digital and IT at the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge.

Daniel Pett
Daniel Pett will be giving the keynote at this year's BL Labs Symposium. Photograph Copyright Chiara Bonacchi (University of Stirling).

  Dan read archaeology at UCL and Cambridge (but played too much rugby) and then worked in IT on the trading floor of Dresdner Kleinwort Benson. Until February this year, he was Digital Humanities lead at the British Museum, where he designed and implemented digital practises connecting humanities research, museum practice, and the creative industries. He is an advocate of open access, open source and reproducible research. He designed and built the award-winning Portable Antiquities Scheme database (which holds records of over 1.3 million objects) and enabled collaboration through projects working on linked and open data (LOD) with the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (New York University) (ISAWNYU) and the American Numismatic Society. He has worked with crowdsourcing and crowdfunding (MicroPasts), and developed the British Museum's 3D capture reputation. He holds Honorary posts at UCL Institute of Archaeology and the Centre for Digital Humanities and publishes regularly in the fields of museum studies, archaeology and digital humanities.

Dan's keynote will reflect on his years of experience in assessing the value, impact and importance of experimenting with, re-imagining and re-mixing cultural heritage digital collections in Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums. Dan will follow in the footsteps of previous prestigious BL Labs keynote speakers: Josie Fraser (2017); Melissa Terras (2016); David De Roure and George Oates (2015); Tim Hitchcock (2014); and Bill Thompson and Andrew Prescott in 2013.

Stella Wisdom (Digital Curator for Contemporary British Collections at the British Library) will give an update on some exciting and innovative projects she and other colleagues have been working on within Digital Scholarship. Mia Ridge (Digital Curator for Western Heritage Collections at the British Library) will talk about a major and ambitious data science/digital humanities project 'Living with Machines' the British Library is about to embark upon, in collaboration with the Alan Turing Institute for data science and artificial intelligence.Throughout the day, there will be several announcements and presentations from nominated and winning projects for the BL Labs Awards 2018, which recognise work that have used the British Library’s digital content in four areas: Research, Artistic, Commercial, and Educational. The closing date for the BL Labs Awards is 11 October, 2018, so it's not too late to nominate someone/a team, or enter your own project! There will also be a chance to find out who has been nominated and recognised for the British Library Staff Award 2018 which showcases the work of an outstanding individual (or team) at the British Library who has worked creatively and originally with the British Library's digital collections and data (nominations close 12 October 2018).

Adam Farquhar (Head of Digital Scholarship at the British Library) will give an update about the future of BL Labs and report on a special event held in September 2018 for invited attendees from National, State, University and Public Libraries and Institutions around the world, where they were able to share best practices in building 'labs style environmentsfor their institutions' digital collections and data.

There will be a 'sneak peek' of an art exhibition in development entitled 'Imaginary Cities' by the visual artist and researcher Michael Takeo Magruder. His practice  draws upon working with information systems such as live and algorithmically generated data, 3D printing and virtual reality and combining modern / traditional techniques such as gold / silver gilding and etching. Michael's exhibition will build on the work he has been doing with BL Labs over the last few years using digitised 18th and 19th century urban maps bringing analog and digital outputs together. The exhibition will be staged in the British Library's entrance hall in April and May 2019 and will be free to visit.

Finally, we have an inspiring talk lined up to round the day off (more information about this will be announced soon), and - as is our tradition - the symposium will conclude with a reception at which delegates and staff can mingle and network over a drink and nibbles.

So book your place for the Symposium today and we look forward to seeing new faces and meeting old friends again!

For any further information, please contact labs@bl.uk

Posted by Mahendra Mahey and Eleanor Cooper (BL Labs Team)

01 May 2018

New Digital Curator in the Digital Scholarship Team

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Adi Keinan-SchoonbaertHello all! My name is Adi Keinan-Schoonbaert, and I’m the new Digital Curator for Asian and African collections at the British Library. One of the core remits of the Digital Scholarship team is to enable and encourage the reuse of the Library’s digital collections. When it comes to Asian and African collections, there are always interesting projects and initiatives going on. One is the Two Centuries of Indian Print project, which just started a second phase in March 2018 – a project with a strong Digital Humanities strand led by Digital Curator Tom Derrick. Another example is a collaborative transcription project, supporting the transcription of handwritten historical Arabic scientific works for Handwritten Text Recognition (HTR) research with the help of volunteers.

To give a bit of a background about myself and how I got to the Library: I’m an archaeologist and heritage professional by education and practice, with a PhD in Heritage Studies from University College London (2013). As a field archaeologist I used to record large quantities of excavation-related data – all manually, on paper. This was probably the first time I saw the potential of applying digital tools and technologies to record, manage and share archaeological data.

My first meaningful engagement with archaeological data and digital technologies started in 2005, when I joined the Israeli-Palestinian Archaeology Working Group (IPAWG) to create a database of all archaeological sites surveyed or excavated by Israel in the West Bank since its occupation in 1967, and its linking with a Geographic Information System (GIS), enabling the spatial visualisation and querying of this data for the first time. The research potential of this GIS-linked database proved so great, that I’ve decided to further explore it in a PhD dissertation. My dissertation focused on archaeological databases covering the occupied West Bank, and I was especially interested in the nature of archaeological records and the way they reflect particular research interests and heritage management priorities, as well as variability in data quality, coverage, accuracy and reliability.

Following my PhD I stayed at UCL Institute of Archaeology as a post-doctoral research associate, and participated in a project called MicroPasts, a UCL-British Museum collaboration. This project used web-based, crowdsourcing methods to allow traditional academics and other communities in archaeology to co-produce innovative open datasets. The MicroPasts crowdsourcing platform provided a great variety of projects through which people could contribute – from transcribing British Museum card catalogues, through tagging videos on the Roman Empire, to photomasking images in preparation for 3D modelling of museum objects.

With the main phase of the MicroPasts project coming to an end, I joined the British Library as Digital Curator (Polonsky Fellow) for the Hebrew Manuscripts Digitisation Project. This role allowed me to create and implement a digital strategy for engaging, accessing and promoting a specific digitised collection, working closely with curators and the Digital Scholarship team. My work included making the collection digitally accessible (on data.bl.uk, working with British Library Labs) and encouraging open licensing, creating a website, promoting the collection in different ways, researching available digital methods to explore and exploit collections in novel ways, and implementing tools such as an online catalogue records viewer (TEI XML), OpenRefine, and 3D modelling.

A 6-months backpacking trip to Asia unexpectedly prepared me for my new role at the Library. I was delighted to join – or re-join – the Library’s Digital Research team, this time as Digital Curator for Asian and African Collections. I find these collections especially intriguing due to their diversity, richness and uniqueness. These include mostly manuscripts, printed books, periodicals, newspapers, photographs and e-resources from Africa, the Middle East (including Qatar Digital Library), Central Asia, East Asia (including the International Dunhuang Project), South Asia, SE Asia – as well as the Visual Arts materials.

I’m very excited to join the Library’s Digital Research team work alongside Neil Fitzgerald, Nora McGregor, Mia Ridge and Stella Wisdom and learn from their rich experience. Feel free to get in touch with us via digitalresearch@bl.uk or Twitter - @BL_AdiKS for me, or @BL_DigiSchol for the Digital Scholarship team.