THE BRITISH LIBRARY

In through the outfield blog

20 December 2012

Launch of the Cooperative Patent Classification

The much anticipated Cooperative Patent Classification (CPC) is now live on the free Espacenet database as a more detailed version of the International Patent Classification (IPC). It replaces the old ECLA classes in that role.

On that database, asking for “Classification” takes you to the CPC schedules, which can be used in its own search box on the database. The alternative is using the IPC in its own search box.

I have already posted about the concepts behind the CPC.

What is essential now is that anyone running current awareness searches, or who is used to searching a particular subject area, check to see if the classification has changed or if new classes are available. 250000 classes replace the old 160000 ECLA classes, a 56% increase.

Even your searching did not include any of the old ECLA classes, there may be new classes available because of the incorporation of concepts from the US classification – in software, for example. Always have a look, you never know what you may find.

The way the CPC can be used from the schedules is somewhat different from the old ECLA.

There is a single search box in which you enter either keywords or a class, or you can drill down through the A to H sequence. For keywords, a list of possibilities is offered in order of preference. Clicking on the box next to the class moves the class to a search box on the left hand side. This will include “low”, which means that any subordinate classes to the chosen class will also be included in the search (click it to alter to exact class).

You can then either click on “Find patents” to run a search or, if additional fields are to be used such as date spans or keywords or selected patent offices, click on “Copy to search form”. A new search mask appears and the additional requests can be made.

Above the schedules are little icons. These allow extra functions, such as “toggle tree”, where the classes that are subdivided are perhaps show more clearly, and the useful green “CPC” icon. Clicking on this means that any CPC as opposed to IPC material is given in green. If an entire entry describing a class is green it means it is CPC only and is not used by the IPC. Other classes may have additional notes or references in green. To the right of the schedules is a little “S” icon, which converts the selected class to PDF format.

Within the Y classes, for interesting material relevant to climate change (but not used by themselves as they are additional classes to the main ones), the number of subclasses has also been dramatically increased.

Those who want to know if a topic has many entries in the CPC which are not in the IPC will benefit by clicking the green CPC icon plus the toggle tree icon. This can show dramatic differences, as in e-commerce in the G06Q30 area, where most of the entries appear in green and are, I suspect, newly added to the what was ECLA.

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